Category Archives: French

A Rewarding Discovery: Exploring Agency in Sixteenth-Century Women’s Writing

DPhil student Nupur Patel (Lincoln College) gives us a glimpse into her research on sixteenth-century French women’s writing, and reflects on her journey to postgraduate work in French.

Admittedly, when I first began my Bachelor’s degree as an undergraduate of French and History, I had no intentions of pursuing postgraduate study. As much as I loved my degree, I always thought it was a distant dream to join the table of scholars at the University, and I was yet to find my own specialised area of interest. My third year was a transformational moment; I began to delve into early modern women’s writing which lit a fire in me. For my undergraduate dissertation, I came across Marguerite de Navarre, who is sometimes called the ‘Mother of the Renaissance’ for her great influence during her lifetime, and beyond. As I become more acquainted with her literature, I decided to explore her role as a playwright and patroness. In the process of reading and writing, I came across other women writers and became fascinated by questions of women’s agency and experiences. This coincided with discussions about intersectional feminism, activist movements and the global Women’s Marches which were placed at the forefront of newspapers and TV screens. These events encouraged me to study a DPhil which looked more deeply into early modern women’s agency.

Les oeuvres de Mesdames Des Roches, de Poitiers, mère et fille. Image credit Wikimedia Commons.

My research looks at responses to the concept of modesty in the works of four sixteenth-century French women’s writers. In the early modern period, modesty was fundamental to the ways in which women are perceived and understood in society. It was means of controlling women’s bodies and sexuality, and was intimately linked to other concepts of chastity, shame and honour. In my project, I look at four sixteenth century women writers – Marguerite de Navarre, Les Dames des Roches and Gabrielle de Coignard – all of whom lived in different areas in France and show that it was possible for writers to challenge, rethink and even completely overturn modesty’s place in early modern French society. In the world of literature, they use their texts as ways to respond to modesty in ways that give them agency and liberate other women from the oppressive term. It is an empowering means for women to reclaim their bodies and sexuality from men who seek to constrain them. An important example where this takes place is late sixteenth century Poitiers, where poet Catherine des Roches lived with her mother, Madeleine des Roches. Together, the pair were known as Les Dames des Roches, and they produced three works in their lifetime: Les Œuvres and Les Secondes Œuvres – which included poetry and prose – followed by Les Missives – the first private letters to be published by women in France.

Portrait of Catherine Des Roches from Costumes historiques de la France. Image credit Wkimedia Commons.

Catherine’s life was particularly intriguing, for she veered away from gender expectations of the time. Instead of marrying and having children, she chose to live with her mother with the hopes of nurturing her great passion for learning and writing. Her mother encouraged her writing, which scholars such as Estienne Pasquier and Scévole de Sainte-Marthe wrote about with great admiration in their dedications. Such figures honoured both women as very talented writers and salon hostesses. Estienne Pasquier, especially, was very fond of Catherine and recalled to his friend, Pierre Pithou, one particular moment during a salon meeting in which a flea landed on Catherine’s bosom; this inspired great wonder in him, which resulted in the publication of La Puce de Madame des Roches, a collection of poems by Pasquier and other male poets who write about this story. These poems come in the form of different languages and reveal an attempt to turn Catherine into an object of male desire. Many of the poets, including Pasquier, are mesmerised by the sight of the male flea sucking blood from her breast. Instead of reflecting male desire, Catherine chooses to reject them in her own flea poem. In her striking account of the flea landing on her bosom, she decides to make the flea a female nymph who seeks refuge from a tyrannical male god. Catherine transforms her body, once a site of eroticism, into a place of shelter and honour; she liberates it from shame and desire and turns it into artistic inspiration for her poetry. Her poem is a striking example of how a woman writer can use her writing to challenge modesty and society’s conceptions of the female body; she, and others in my study, reveal moments of empowerment within the confines of patriarchal society.

Studying Catherine des Roches and the other women in my study has been a very rewarding experience, and a great reminder of the breadth of topics that can be studied in French literature. As I try to unearth moments of early modern women’s agency, I have colleagues who study medical literature, postcolonial texts, the depiction of disabilities, and dancing manuals. As my first undergraduate dissertation taught me, when studying languages, the possibilities at endless, whether, like me, you are looking at women’s writing in the sixteenth century, or at something completely different.

by Nupur Patel

The first Choix Goncourt Britannique: When we talk about writing

Julia Moore is a third-year student at Christ Church reading French and English. Here are her personal reflections on being part of the first Choix Goncourt Britannique.

Writing a book is hard—you know, you get a publisher, or fail to, and you spend years grovelling at the feet of your work and perhaps a man behind a well-known desk. At least, that’s how the authors write it. In Anna Gavalda’s Je Voudrais Que Quelqu’un m’Attende Quelque part, she includes a postscript in the form of another short story. By using her form to embrace the technical realities of the (physical!) copy the reader holds, she shines a humorous light on the whole affair—the inspiration, rejection, ridiculous meticulous search for the right colour of paper binding. A light, certainly, but a spotlight as well: this is how it happens, she says, this is it.  Publication becomes a story: this sort of fictional concern with the more tedious aspects of writing can reinforce what we think about inspiration, construction, or even the political undertones of writing, especially to sell.

In Little Women, Jo’s plight of publication is just as mundane—and yet, it arrives as a crucial moment in the history of what it means to be a female commercial writer. By becoming a story, it demonstrates itself. Writing about writing makes us more aware of all the things that are happening in and around the book.  Jane Eyre was originally published as Jane Eyre: An Autobiography, after all. What is it that we feel about the first-person women, and their direct or indirect free speech? All four of the books we were to discuss were in the first person. We tended to take this for granted;  Dame Marina Warner, one of the senior judges and member of the Royal Society, made our group of student judges feel rather silly when she pointed out that none of us had  even mentioned, let alone questioned, the first person in the narratives we were presented with.

Judging fiction is a strange mix—sometimes, it can seem just as mundane and unromantic as publishing it. Unpicking and debating- all that de-storifying can seem slightly unfair at times—to the book, to the author—the French Goncourt jury has often been accused of publishing bribes and stakes in great shares. Judging a book isn’t just about that though, not really, especially if the people doing it sit behind food and wine, or on a bed or in a bus. People like you and me—and there were a few of us in Oxford, and a few in 6 other universities[1] who did just that.

The French Goncourt Prize is more or less equivalent to the Man Booker prize in the UK. It is a big cultural institution in France, and is judged rather unconventionally by 10 novelists (sometimes referred to as “Les Dix”) who are members of the “Académie Goncourt”, in the Restaurant Drouant, Paris. The prize is a symbolic cheque for ten euros, and the well-recognised accolade: Prix Goncourt. Proust won it in 1919, exactly 100 years from the Choix Goncourt Britannique last year. A Choix Goncourt is a choice made from the same shortlist by a different group of people: there is a Prix Goncourt des Lycéens for a secondary school jury in France, for example. December 2019 was the first Choix Goncourt Britannique, but other countries like Belgium or Lebanon have student juries like ours pick their winner.

We had four books[2] to read, and we had to come up with a winner. Not alone—about 10 of us in Oxford, and similar numbers in Queen’s Belfast, Cardiff, Aberdeen, Cambridge, Warwick, and St Andrew’s. Two of each group met in London to discuss and award the first (perhaps not-yet-coveted) Choix Goncourt Britannique. The word choice is what sets student juries apart from the French group of restaurant-going novelists that award the Prix Goncourt. The focus of choice is not just who gets chosen picked, but also who is choosing. We were very aware of ourselves and our very obviously personal choices. What do we know about picking and choosing the novel we think is best? Well, what should we know? And does anyone? We pinpointed things: style, narrative, underlying images, characterisation,… the list goes on. And it can—the thing was that we were never completely finished.

In Oxford, and, later, in London, we decided on Tous les Hommes n’habitent pas le monde de la même façon by Jean-Paul Dubois. It was salient to so many of the individuals in our group that it quickly became the centrepiece of comparative discussions. It is about a man, his cell-mate, and the people that make up his past. We talked about way that the narrative works, crossed between the past, the present, and the succession of dog smiles and technical failures that exist in both. We liked reading it—we enjoyed looking everyday words up and wondering about whether or not the book was “About Capitalism”. There’s something very joyful about being able to read and think and think and read, completely essay-less, yet with a real discussion with real people who also have thoughts and readings about fiction. The fact that all the books are contemporary adds to the immediacy of looking forward to the translation of our book-elect, and to Jean-Paul Dubois’ tour of  UK universities; the gleeful possibilities of being alone with a book are sustained, rather than dampened, by the idea of an author to talk to.

To read more about the Choix Goncourt Britannique, see a piece by another Oxford member of the panel, James Hughes, in The Oxford Polyglot https://www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/oxford-polyglot/2019-20/2/united-kingdoms-choix-goncourt-more-book-club and read Professor Dame Marina Warner’s speech at the award https://www.mod-langs.ox.ac.uk/oxford-polyglot/2019-20/2/awarding-frances-most-prestigious-literary-prize


[1] Oxford, Cambridge, and Warwick from England, Cardiff from Wales, Aberdeen and St Andrew’s from Scotland, and Queen’s Belfast from Northern Ireland

[2] Soif, by Amélie Nothomb, Tous les Hommes n’habitent pas le monde de la même façon, by Jean-Paul Dubois, Extérieur Monde by Olivier Rolin, and La Part du Fils, by Jean-Luc Coatelem.

Student Snapshot

Over the last few weeks, we have shared with you some of the material we would normally tell you about at an open day. Dr Simon Kemp, Tutor in French and Co-Director of Outreach, gave us a video overview of what it’s like to study modern languages at Oxford… but do the current students agree?

We asked three current undergraduates to tell us a little bit about their experience of studying languages with us: Dalveen is in her first year studing Spanish and Linguistics; Alex is in his second year studying French and History; Charlotte also studies French and History and is in her final year. Here they give us a glimpse of what Oxford has been like through their eyes.

French Flash Fiction Competition: Commended Stories

Image by annca from Pixabay

It’s our final flash fiction post of the season and, to wrap up, we bring you some of the brilliant stories from the students in the Years 7-11 category who were commended by the judges. Félicitations!

Comment être un chien

Pour être un chien, il faut être très mignon. Tes yeux sont faits pour dire, « j’ai très faim ! » ou « je veux jouer toute la journée, sans arrêt ! » et ta fourrure est réconfortante à toucher.
« Voilà, Galette. » dira ton maître, et il te câlinera. Tu as, maintenant, une tranche de bœuf magnifique.
Aussi, tu dois manger tout, aller au jardin, jouer tout le temps et marcher sur le tapis avec des pieds sales.
« Non, Galette ! »
Mais surtout, cherche toujours le sourire de ton maître, parce que s’il n’est pas content, ton travail n’est pas fini.

(Carla Lubin, Year 7)

C’est le 6 Juin 1844 à Luc sur Mer, je prépare ma toile pour la peinture. La plage est silencieuse. Je suis perdu dans ma dessin quand brusquement, le ciel devient gris, la pluie couvre le ciel mais mes doigts ne veulent pas s’arrêter. Je peins plus que je peux vois. La mer semble rouge alors que des centaines d’hommes montent la plage de navires et battements métalliques que je n’ai vu jamais auparavant. Tous les hommes portent la même vert vêtements. Ma toile est rempli avec guerre et horreur.

 Mon frère il regarde la toile. ‘Quelle imagination tu as’.

(Lara Hardy-Smith, Year 11)

C’était une journée normale à Londres, en Angleterre, à la fin de l’été 1666. Il faisait chaud et le soleil brillait brillamment sur la Tamise. La place du marché grouillait d’acheteurs et de vendeurs et la boulangerie avait une longue file d’attente; très probablement en raison de l’odeur de pain sortant du four. Au fil du temps, les cris des marchands sont partis et le soleil s’est couché sous l’horizon. Dans la boulangerie, le boulanger emballait ses pains lorsque quelqu’un entra. En fait, c’était un chien! Un petit chien mignon. Un petit chien mignon avec une torche allumée dans sa bouche. Soudain, il jeta la torche au fond de la boulangerie et un terrible incendie se déclara.

C’est vraiment ce qui s’est passé et ce qui a déclenché le grand incendie de Londres.

(Aiden Politiek, Year 10)

Deux mondes

Mes ennemis suivent mon moindre pas, je ne peux pas m’arrêter. Je marche, seul, hanté par une peur invisible et féroce. Je suis un chevalier perdu, épouvanté par ma solitude et craignant de ne jamais revoir mon royaume. Soudainement, une figure pale surgit des bois obscurs : elle s’avance et la lumière révèle un visage grave. “Aidez-moi, s’il vous plait…” ma soif et fatigue sont telles que mes lèvres ne bougent presque plus. Mais l’homme, sans empathie, indique l’horloge. “C’est l’heure, mademoiselle, rentrez chez vous.” Alors, timidement, je ferme le livre et me hâte de laisser la bibliothèque déjà vide.

(Silvia Rossi, Year 10)

L’ombre de Venise

Venise. Le soleil plongeait ses couleurs corail dans le canal. Un jeune garçon longeait les quais, jetant des galets dans l’eau opaque. Il aperçut une ombre, regarda vers le ciel. Rien. Il suivit le fantôme vers des ruelles lugubres et isolées, seules quelques étoiles perçaient le crépuscule. Soudain son pied fut happé à travers les planches tordues dans le canal brumeux. Des bulles jaillirent de sa bouche, ses cheveux se métamorphosèrent en corail argenté, de fines écailles grises transpercèrent sa peau devenue diaphane. Il hurla, regarda ses mains palmées. L’ombre fit un signe. Il s’enfonça dans les profondeurs de Venise.

(Clémence Buffelard, Year 9)

Je ne dormais pas. Je m’appelle Jacques et je ne dormais pas. Depuis que cette chanson a été faite, ma vie a changé. Tous les jours, tout le temps, les enfants chantent la chanson ennuyeuse. Je trouve ça ennuyeux car je ne dormais pas mais je mangeais mon petit déjeuner. J’appréciais ma bouillie mais j’ai alors oublié de sonner les cloches du matin. Donc, je vous en supplie, s’il vous plaît, arrêtez de chanter la chanson.

(Kairav Singh, Year 9)

Je cours

Je cours. Je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je besoin de la faire avant ils réalisent je suis parti. J’arrive à le pont. Il y a les voitures au-dessous de moi. Il y a l’excès de vitesse le long de l’autoroute. J’arrive à la barrière. J’escalade. Je saute. Je me réveille. Je retourne à le pont. J’arrive à la barrière. J’escalade. Je saute. Je me réveille. Je retourne à le pont. J’entends un moteur vrombissement. Un camion vient à moi. Il me frappe. Je ne vois rien. Certain choses vous ne pouvez pas échappé.

(Jonathan Stockill, Year 7)

“Soit dit en passant, Harry,” dit le professeur Dumbledore à mi-chemin du livre six, “une prophétie dit que vous seul pouvez vaincre le mal Lord Voldemort. C’est pour ça qu’il essaie de te tuer. Vous devez détruire les sept morceaux de son â me, et il vous reste un livre pour le faire. Ne vous attendez pas à de l’aide de ma part; Je serai assassiné de façon spectaculaire en deux chapitres. En plus de cela, il ya des examens à passer et des remous hormonaux à composer avec. Maintenant, souhaitez-vous être allé à ce Muggle complet?”

(Ryan Kwarteng, Year 7)

C’était son premier jour. Après que sa carrière musicale n’ait pas fonctionné, Morhange s’est retrouvé à regarder la grande entrée de Fond de L’Etang, un endroit qu’il avait toujours voulu quitter mais qu’il n’avait jamais pu. Il est entré dans l’école et a vu son ancienne salle de classe. à l’intérieur, ses nouveaux élèves attendaient patiemment. Morhange pensa à Clément Mathieu et le remercia avant de prendre une profonde inspiration et d’entrer dans la pièce. Un étudiant a crié: “Qui êtes-vous?” Souriant, Morhange a dit “Bonjour classe. Je m’appelle M. Morhange. Je suis votre professeur de musique.”

(Riya Mistry, Year 9)

(Harriet Preston, Year 9)

French Flash Fiction: Highly Commended Years 7-11

Image by suncy95 from Pixabay

We’ve seen the highly commended Fernch stories from the sixth formers so let’s see what the younger students had to offer. Here are some of the highly commended entries from the students in Years 7-11…

La voix de langue

Bonjour ! Ça va ? Ces phrases pourraient être dites de différentes manières. Mes petits symboles qui aident à former de structures, qui forment une chaîne de dialogue qui sort de la bouche des gens, ou n’importe où ailleurs. Si je n’ai jamais existé, comment auriez-vous dit à quelqu’un que vous les aimiez, fait rire quelqu’un ou même communiqué du tout? Vous voyez donc? J’existe sous plusieurs formes. Je tiens les portes de communication. Mes mots détiennent les clés de toutes les émotions. Rappelez-vous donc toujours. Les mots peuvent inspirer, les mots peuvent détruire. Alors, s’il vous plait choisissez-les judicieusement.

(Davina Balakumar, Year 9)

La Neige

Elle examinait le livre poussiéreux. “La neige” la chose blanche s’appellait. Elle apparaissait chaque hiver. Toujours l’hiver l’avait embrouillé. Les saisons avec les temps différents, les temperatures différentes, elles étaient étranges. Sa mère pourrait se souvenir de, avec doute, la neige quand elle était jeune. Mais maintenant la neige était une relique du passé. Elle était dans les films âgés, décrivée d’avoir froid, d’être fraiche. Mais tous ces “hivers” étaient le même: chaud et sec. De l’eau, comme d’habitude, était chaud et rare. Elle ne devenait jamais les cristals. Elle n’avait pas besoin de les devenir. Elle était déjà précieuse.

(Georgia Clarke, Year 10)

Ma vie

J’habitais dans un monde de verre – je mangerais et je dormais. Ma vie était une existence morne et j’ai désiré la liberté et la passion! Tous les jours, j’ai essayé de m’échapper. J’ai sauté plus haut qu’une gazelle et j’ai fouillé pour une sortie avec plus de détermination qu’un inspecteur. Mais puis, un jour, mon monde a basculé. Soudainement, je ne pouvais pas respirer! Je tombais pour un long moment, avant d’atterrir dans la toilette.
Maintenant, je sais que la liberté n’est pas ce que j’attendais. Moi, un poisson rouge, devrait être plus prudent que je souhaite!

(Isaac Timms, Year 9)

La nostalgie fanée

Ah, les plaisirs simples de la jeunesse. Une rose poussiéreuse, douce et rouge. Yeux verts au milieu de la nuit et l’odeur familière du vin aigre. Le rire des danses qui étaient toujours des erreurs. Le rire résonne encore à mes oreilles des années plus tard.
Ces souvenirs sont des morceaux d’une époque à laquelle je ne pourrai jamais revenir, une ère de nostalgie douce-amère.
“Ah, Maman.” soupire la femme devant moi. “Pourquoi tu ne te souviens pas de moi?”
Bien que je me souvienne de son visage, je ne sais pas toujours qui elle est.
Le rire résonne encore.

(Jamilya Bertram, Year 11)

Mon grand-père né au milieu de 1919 était destiné à combattre dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale. c’était une nuit fraîche éclairée seulement par la lueur orange du soleil couchant, nous nous sommes précipités vers la maison de grand-père alors que son hangar de dix ans a brûlé jusqu’au sol. Un couple de pompiers nous a laissés tout près alors qu’ils se précipitaient pour pomper l’eau du ruisseau à 800 mètres.
Nous avons regardé le hangar monter en flammes, ce qui a réveillé de bons souvenirs.
La vraie tristesse est venue lorsque mon grand-père âgé, qui nʼétait pas sorti du lit, a tranquillement demandé si les photos de son régiment étaient en sécurité.

(Joanna Kazantzidi, Year 7)

Dans la bibliothèque, il y a des lumières. Les lumières qui volent comme les étoiles dans le ciel de minuit. Mais cette beauté est dangereuse. On peut s’oublier.
Et si on va plus loin dans la bibliothèque, ce que on trouve sont des armes de milliers. Elles sont les choses les plus dangereuses et puissantes dans le monde entier.
Chaque soldat l’a construit en utilisant les mêmes vingt-six lettres. Chaque arme est différente.
Toutes sont complètement différentes à cause de l’émotion. La tristesse. La joie. La colère. La peur.
Ça, c’est la vrai magique.

(Katy Marsh, Year 11)

Auto-Isolement

Je jette et tourne depuis heures quand j’ai décidé que je me lèverais. J’étais chaud, donc j’ai ouvert la fenêtre. Soudain, j’ai entendu un bruit. Il me semblait qu’il m’appelait. Impossible ! Néanmoins, je suis sortie de ma fenêtre, et je volais ! J’ai flotté entre les nuages et s’est envolé sur les toits. J’étais aux anges avec ma nouvelle habilité, et j’ai voulu  voir le monde. J’ai volé dessus des grandes-villes impressionnantes, et les plages la plus belles. Mais, finalement j’ai dû retourner. J’ai pensé, demain je devrai rester chez moi. Si seulement mes rêves pouvaient durer éternellement.   

(Megan Beach, Year 11)

Olympe de Gouges

Ils méprisaient mes idées, méconnaissaient mes droits et, pire encore, opprimaient mon peuple. Cependant, je me tiens ici avec une dignité sans tache, car peu de femmes ont eu l’occasion de le faire, et je vois ma tragédie comme un pas vers d’égalité; un dernier acte de défi de ma part. Je serai forte. Je vais me battre jusqu’à la fin. Bien que la lame hostile me nargue ainsi, je ne me soumettrai pas à son regard inamical. Je ne mourrai pas en vain. Les enfants de ma ville natale vengeront ma mort.

(Ruby Watts, Year 10)

Apollo Vingt

«BIP, BIP!» C’est la pagaille dans l’agence spatiale internationale. «DÉTONATION!» La fusée est lancée dans le ciel aussi vite qu’un éclair sans regrets. La fusée avance à toute vitesse, presque en orbite, Apollo vingt est plus chaude que la lave. Louis Armstrong et Sylvie Aldrin regrettent d’avoir pris ces décisions qui allaient changer leurs vies, tout en progressant de plus en plus rapidement. Louis regarde par la fenêtre épaisse et ovale et ce qu’il voit de ses yeux baignés de larmes était transcendant. Il fixe paralysé par l’horreur car sur Mars il voit un million d’yeux lui fix du regard.

(Toby Greenwood, Year 8)

Je suis une armoire qui ne sera jamais oubliée par mon utilisateur, mais qui dans le coin de cette pièce délabrée, n’aurait jamais de deuxième vie.
Ouvrez-moi et vous verrez mon passé.
Dans le premier tiroir se trouve l’enfance et le bonheur. Jetez-y un œil et les couleurs rayonnantes des vêtements vous frapperont.
Dans le second tiroir se trouve la romance et l’amour. Reniflez un peu et vous sentirez le doux parfum des fleurs.
Dans le troisième tiroir se trouve la mort. Un endroit sombre mais pourtant pas aussi effrayant à ce qu’il parait.
Pour toujours, je l’accompagnerai.

(Tom Clapham, Year 10)

La bombe. Le flash. Soudain, j’étais de retour dans la salle de classe surchauffée. J’ai ouvert les yeux lorsque la maison où j’ai été faite a été engloutie par les flammes. Je peux encore sentir sa prise chaude contre mon nouveau corps velu. Mais je suis toujours là, le rembourrage bleu squashy réconfortant mon corps rempli de cendres. La fumée emplit mes yeux et mon nez suffocant. J’habite à Londres cette ville, de puissants incendies se sont propagés dans les maisons. Je suis Winston le Teddy qui a survécu à la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

(Yuvraj Kambo. Year 9)

French Flash Fiction: Highly Commended Sixth Formers

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

This week on Adventures on the Bookshelf we’re continuing to showcase some of the top entries from this year’s French flash fiction competition. Here are some of the highly commended stories from the older category. Well done to everyone!

Les Arbres

Les arbres voient beaucoup de choses que nous ne connaissons pas. Ils gardent des secrets, ils se souviennent du passé, et si on pense assez fort, ils peuvent entendre nos pensées. Avez-vous déjà pensé “Les arbres. Pourquoi sont-ils si étrange?” Si on pourrais communiquer avec eux, révélerait-ils leurs mystères?
Croyez-le ou non, je parle parfois avec les arbres. Je veux les comprendre, donc je leur pose des questions. Le matin, je m’asseoie sous l’arbre dans mon jardin- je le regarde comme un roi ou un montagne majestueux. Chaque matin je demande “À quoi vous pensez?”
J’attends encore une réponse.

(Lily Bamber, Year 12)

Ma mère et moi sommes venus en France il y a cinq mois. On est venus avec l’espoir d’une vie plus heureuse qu’au Congo où il y a la guerre. Nous restons dans une auberge miteuse et pleine d’escrocs. Il y a deux semaines que mes boucles d’oreilles en or de Maman Shungu ont été volées. J’les y laisse sur mon lit et quand je reviens elles avaient été prises sous mon oreiller. Si tu gardes ces bijoux t’aura de la chance elle m’a dit. Je pense que c’est de la superstition. Nous serons coincés ici pour toujours. C’est dommage.

(Ketsia-Patience Kasongo, Year 13)

Le ciel violet

Je le regarde, du coin du grenier. Il s’asseoit parfaitement immobile en regardant le ciel violet. Sa chaise est centrale dans la chambre, le seul meuble là-bas, et il est enveloppé par la nuit étoilée, sa concentration a souligné par le silence. Son visage est assombri par une brume violette. Bien que nous soyons à distance de toucher, nos âmes sont seules, tourmentées par leur isolement. Je ne peux plus y résister. Je me dirige vers lui, mets ma main sur son épaule et je peux sentir son frisson sous moi- il me manque, il me manque. J’aimerais être vivant.

(Emily Bell, Year 12)

En France, il y a de la liberté, de l’égalité, de la fraternité, mais il n’y a pas de mangues. Bon, elles sont là, mais elles sont séchées et ratatinées comme le sein d’une vieille. La lumière de miel de mon enfance ne peut pas traverser la frontière, alors les mangues ici boivent une lumière grise comme les eaux usées. Chez moi, le nectar d’or des mangues brille sur la peau et le goût sucré reste dans la bouche pendant des heures. La douceur de ces mangues me rendait éloquente. Ici, je n’ai pas de mots.

(Blessing Verrall, Year 12)

L’attente

L’attente est un état d’âme permanent. C’est quasiment un acte qui nous accable, tous.
Elle, (la fille) attend son bien-aimé. Elle vie dans l’anticipation aigue d’un signe de vie, d’un texto. Une attente solennelle, angoissante et même sublime. Chaque instant est en stase, pesant et pénible. Son état d’âme est aussi accablant que le néant d’une pièce blanche vide. L’attente provoque des suppositions, de telle sorte que la fille perd tout sens des proportions.
Lui (le bien-aimé) ne l’attend pas. Il ne sait pas qu’il la fait attendre. Il est absent car il l’a oublié.

(Allegra Stirling, Year 12)

Le Cadeau

Elle a regardé le reflet de la poupée. Elle a ouvert la porte et est entré dans le magazine. Elle a établi un contact visuel avec le marchand. Attrapant la poupée, elle a sprinté par la porte et dans la rue. Le commerçant a crié après elle. Elle a tourné le coin et a couru vers son amie. “Joyeux Anniversaire!” elle a chuchoté, en donnant la poupée à la petite fille. Elle a ensuite regardé la fille réveiller sa mère et ses quatre frères, tous qui dormaient sur le bord de la route. “Regardez,” dit-elle avec un immense sourire, “j’ai un cadeau.”

(Harriet Townhill, Year 12)

Il fait mauvais, comme toujours. Deux piqûres d’épingle percent les nuages comme des yeux, qui me regardent comme si je trangressais la loi. Mais non, je fais les courses ! Je m’assure que j’ai mon attestation et ma liste. Je doute que je puisse en cocher la moitié cette fois, mais il faut quand même essayer. J’ai apporté deux sacs, même si je sais que je n’en aurai besoin que d’un. D’ailleurs, j’aurais laissé les pâtes, les œufs, s’ils avaient été encore là ; je suis habituée à être altruiste. Pause terminée… aucune provision. J’entre dans l’hôpital.

(Nikita Jain, Year 13)

French Flash Fiction – The runners up

The competition was stiff in the French Flash Fiction contest this year and we were fortunate not only to have some fantastic winners but also some brilliant runners up. We hope you like them as much as we did.

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Alors qu’elle courait, elle s’est sentie exaltée. Elle savait qu’elle ne devrait pas faire ça mais c’était tellement bon. Avec l’herbe sur ses jambes et les étoiles scintillantes au-dessus.
Mais pour une raison quelconque, elle avait l’impression d’être surveillée.
En le regardant, il se sentait inquiet. Doit-il en parler à quelqu’un? Elle serait mise en prison. Cependant, les satellites qu’il utilisait ont été illégalement accédés. Tout d’un coup, il a réalisé quoi faire.
Quand elle est rentrée chez elle, elle a vérifié sur son ordinateur portable pour tout travail scolaire. Pas de travail juste un seul e-mail

«Arrêtez de faire ça» de Absolument personne@froabsolutelorg.pirate

(Dexter Speed, Year 8)

Les Horloges

Elles sont accrochées aux murs, regardent l’heure et regardent tout: Naissance de bébés
Enfants qui grandissent
Jeunes qui se disputent
Et les horloges sont toujours accrochées, regardant l’heure

Les jeunes adultes partent à l’université
Et puis reviennent, mais pas seul
Jeunes couples, partent
Les adultes seuls reviennent
Et le temps passe encore

Les couples repartent
Naissance de bébés
Et ainsi le processus se répète à nouveau
Et le temps passe

Horloges, elles sont accrochées aux murs
Disent d’heure à tout le monde
Mais tout ce qu’elles ont vu pendant toutes ces années
Si seulement elles pouvaient se souvenir

(Ben Whiting, Year 10)

Un Vrai Supplice

La chaleur monte en moi comme le lierre grimpant. Il y a un mille-pattes avec ses minuscules pieds d’enfer qui danse sur mon cuir chevelu. Les muscles derrières mes genoux sont coupés. Le sentiment est viscéral. Pas loin, il y a un froissement de papier. Un bonbon. Les voix douces me parviennent comme le murmure d’un ruisseau.
Pas loin, les gens se détendent. Pas loin, les gens attendent.
Une main me serre à la gorge. Les mots – viendront-ils? Personne ne sait.
Un moment de silence.
La lumière se baisse.
Le rideau se lève.

(Ella Hartley, Year 12)

French Flash Fiction Competition 2020 – Results!

Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

The French Flash Fiction Competition launched in December and ran until the end of March. During that time, we received more than four hundred entries across the two age categories. A huge well done to every who submitted a story to us – we were blown away by the imagination and linguistic inventiveness on display. We’re pleased to announce the winners today, and we’ll be featuring some of the runners up, highly commended, and commended stories on this blog in the coming weeks.

In the Years 7-11 category the winner is Yohann Godinho, in Year 10, and the runners up are Dexter Speed, in Year 8, and Ben Whiting in Year 10. The judges highly commended eleven entries: Davina Balakumar, Year 9; Georgia Clarke, Year 10; Isaac Timms, Year 9; Jamilya Bertram, Year 11; Joanna Kazantzidi, Year 7; Katy Marsh, Year 11; Megan Beach, Year 11; Ruby Watts, Year 10; Toby Greenwood, Year 8; Tom Clapham, Year 10; and Yuvraj Kambo, Year 9. A further eleven entries were commended: Aiden Politiek, Year 10; Carla Lubin, Year 7; Clémence Buffelard, Year 9; Hannah Uddin, Year 9; Harriet Preston, Year 9; Jonathan Stockill, Year 7; Kairav Singh, Year 9; Lara Hardy-Smith, Year 11; Riya Mistry, Year 9; Ryan Kwarteng, Year 7; and Silvia Rossi, Year 10.

The judges said: “In the younger age category we were absolutely spoilt for choice. So many of the stories demonstrated narrative flair and ingenuity, from the intertextual tales that offered a new take on familiar stories to the historical narratives, from quiet reflections on the state of the world to hard-hitting insights into the climate crisis. In the end, the winning story was one which married a refreshing stylistic simplicity with a moving sense of comfort and reassurance, perfectly encapsulating the current moment.”

In the Years 12-13 category, the winner is Zoe Prokopiou, in Year 12, and the runner up is Ella Hartley, in Year 12. Highly commended are: Allegra Stirling, Year 12; Bethan Mapes, Year 13; Blessing Verrall, Year 12; Emily Bell, Year 12; Harriet Townhill, Year 12; Ketsia-Patience Kasongo, Year 13; Lily Bamber, Year 12; and Nikita Jain, Year 13.

The judge said: “There were so many outstanding flash fiction entries in our Years 12-13 category this year. It was a pleasure to read them, and a real challenge to pick the best. I was very heartened by the amazing creativity and enthusiasm to express yourselves in a second language, conjuring up vivid feelings, colourful characters and sometimes whole worlds in just a few lines of text. In picking the winners I’ve paid more attention to the imagination on show than the strict grammatical accuracy, although the quality of French was very high throughout. I’ve also leaned a little more towards those entries that somehow managed in that tiny space to tell a whole story over those that were a little more like an essay or character portrait. And in choosing the overall winner, I was definitely influenced a bit by the fact that it managed to bring a tear to my eye in only ninety-four words. You’ll see why.”

Congratulations to all the winners, runners up, highly commended and commended entrants! The selection process was a tough one because so many of the stories we received had merit: we would like to underline the fact that writing a short story in another language is far from easy and that everyone who entered deserves to feel proud of their efforts.

Here are the two winning stories, and more entries will be featured over the weeks and months ahead…

Yohann’s story:

Je me suis réveillé. Je suis descendu les escaliers et ouvrit le frigo. Le frigo était vide. Je n’avais plus de lait ! Je suis parti de ma maison. Le soleil se a leva doucement au-dessus de l’horizon. Les trottoirs étaient déjà chauds, de prélasser à ses rayons. La brise tranquille a fait tiède. L’herbe a émis son parfum fraîchement coupé. Les arbres ont bruissé pendant que leurs résidents ailés se ont bavardé. C’était tous les signes d’espoir, qu’aujourd’hui serait un jour meilleur, plein de lait somptueux. Je suis entré dans le magasin. J’ai vu le lait.

Zoe’s story:

Elle a fermé la porte derrière elle et elle a respiré profondément. L’air frais a coulé dans ses poumons pour la première fois depuis un certain temps. Le ciel était bleu clair, peint avec des nuages blancs, et le soleil brillait. En commençant à marcher, elle a remarqué que le manque de gens dans la rue et le silence auxquels elle s’était habituée, avaient été remplacés par un nouveau bruit. Les trottoirs étaient pleins de gens qui souriaient. Elle pouvait sentir le soulagement commun de chaque personne que le monde revenait à la normale.

Why should we read translated texts?

This week, we’re back to the Linguamania podcast, produced by the Creative Multilingualism research programme. The third episode in the podcast series explores the question ‘Why should we read translated texts?’ and features two of our brilliant Modern Languages tutors: Prof. Jane Hiddleston, Tutor in French at Exeter College, and Dr Laura Lonsdale, Tutor in Spanish at Queen’s College.

In this episode of LinguaMania, we’re exploring what we lose or gain when we read a translated book. Are we missing something by reading the English translation and not the original language version? Or can the translation process enhance the text in some way? Jane Hiddleston and Laura Lonsdale from the University of Oxford discuss these questions and also look at what fiction and translation can tell us about how languages blend with one another and interact.

Listen to the podcast below or peruse the full transcript here.

A Writer’s War

Last week we brought you news of an exciting new podcast from Creative Multilingualism. This week, we have another new podcast to share with you – this one produced by some of our academics in collaboration with the wonderful Year 10 students at Oxford Spires Academy. The podcasts are available to listen to here.

The Oxford Spires Academy’s project “A Writer’s War” was designed to examine how writers from the UK, France, and Germany responded to the First World War in poetry and prose. Students were encouraged to draw parallels between texts in three languages, and examined the respective authors’ experiences of the war, as well as cultural and artistic reactions to war. To this end, students were encouraged to ponder whether war, for the writers in question, was seen as a patriotic endeavour, or as a time of suffering, or as something altogether quite different. Students were shown archive documents sent from the trenches or diary entries from those at home.

The students were also taken to Magdalen College, where they examined various memorials such as that commemorating Ernst Stadler, a German Expressionist poet, Rhodes scholar, and Magdalen alumnus. Stadler was killed in battle at Zandvoorde near Ypres in the early months of World War I. Stadler was not named on the Magdalen War Memorial as he was a foreign combatant, but later received a separate plaque on Magdalen’s grounds. This opportunity enabled students to examine the politics of commemoration and the question of post-war reconciliation. Students were encouraged to think about such issues beyond the case of WW1.

Royal Irish Rifles ration party Somme July 1916 . Via Wikimedia Commons.

Organised by the Head of Languages, Rebekah Finch, students at the Oxford Spires Academy engaged in research-led workshops with interventions from Professor Toby Garfitt, Professor Ritchie Robertson, and Andrew Wynn-Owen (a current Ph.D. student and published poet) on the literatures of the three linguistic areas. The students also enjoyed a creative writing workshop with Andrew Wynn Owen, where they wrote their own poems about war.

Catriona Oliphant of Chrome Media presented a skills workshop on creating podcasts, after which each pupil made a short podcast about the project and experience, discussing what they had seen, read, thought, or written.

Professor Toby Garfitt, Professor Ritchie Robertson, Andrew Wynn-Owen, Professor Santanu Das (a specialist of WW1 and the Indian sub-continent) and Professor Catriona Seth also recorded podcasts on the topic.

The students enjoyed studying parallel and diverging literary traditions, and gained a greater awareness of various literary genres, the politics of commemoration, gendered reactions to war, and war as the subject for literary texts.

Cilck here to access the podcasts. There are nine episodes:

  1. Dulce et Decorum Est. In the first four podcasts, we hear from Year 10 students at Oxford Spires Academy.
  2. Fête. This is the second of four podcasts, in which we hear from Year 10 students at Oxford Spires Academy.
  3. All Quiet on the Western Front. This is the third of four podcasts in which we hear from Year 10 students at Oxford Spires Academy.
  4. In Memoriam. This is the last of four podcasts in which we hear from Year 10 students at Oxford Spires Academy.
  5. Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! In this podcast, we hear from Prize Fellow and poet Andrew Wynn Owen and Senior Research Fellow Prof. Santanu Das of All Souls College about the British response to the First World War.
  6. Art, Adventure, Love. In this podcast, we hear from Prof. Toby Garfitt, Emeritus Fellow of Magdalen College, about the response in France to the First World War.
  7. Storm of Steel. In this podcast, we hear from Ritchie Robertson, Taylor Professor of the German Language and Literature and Fellow of The Queen’s College, about the German response to the First World War.
  8. From Across the Seas They Came. We conclude this group of podcasts with a discussion about responses to the First World War in former colonies of the British and French Empires. Catriona Seth, Marshal Foch Professor of French Literature and Fellow of All Souls College, chairs a conversation between Prof. Santanu Das, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, and Prof. Toby Garfitt, Emeritus Fellow of Magdalen College.
  9. President Warren at Home. In the final podcast in our series, we visit the archives of Magdalen College to hear from archivist Dr Charlotte Berry and archives assistant Ben Taylor about some of the items in the College’s First World War collection.