Tag Archives: Competitions

FRENCH AND SPANISH FLASH FICTION COMPETITIONS OPEN!

Happy New Year everyone! We hope you had a wonderful and restful break over the festive period.

We’re delighted to announce the return of our ever-popular French and Spanish Flash Fiction competitions for secondary school pupils. If you are learning French and/or Spanish in Years 7-13, you are invited to send us a *very* short story to be in with a chance of winning up to £100. Read on to find out more…

Photo by Florian Klauer on Unsplash

What is Flash Fiction?

We’re looking for a complete story, written in French or Spanish, using no more than 100 words.

Did you know that the shortest story in Spanish is only seven words long?

Cuando despertó, el dinosaurio todavía estaba allí.
(When he woke up, the dinosaur was still there.)

– Augusto Monterroso Bonilla (1921-2003)

What are the judges looking for?

Our judging panel of academics will be looking for imagination and narrative flair, as well as linguistic ability and accuracy. Your use of French or Spanish will be considered in the context of your age and year group: in other words, we will not expect younger pupils to compete against older pupils linguistically. For inspiration, you can read last year’s winning entries for French here, and for Spanish here.

What do I win?

The judges will award a top prize of £100, as well as prizes of £25 to a maximum of two runners up, in each category. Certificates will also be awarded to pupils who have been highly commended by our judges. Results as well as the winning, runner up, and highly commended stories will be published on this blog, if entrants give us permission to do so.

How do I enter?

You can submit your story via our online forms at the links below. This year, in response to the amazing number of entries we received last year, we have expanded the competition to include a third age category!

FrenchSpanish
Years 7-9 (ages 11-14) Years 7-9 (ages 11-14)
Years 10-11 (ages 14-16) Years 10-11 (ages 14-16)
Years 12-13 (ages 16-18) Years 12-13 (ages 16-18)
Click on the links to be taken to the correct submission form for your age/year group.

You may only submit one story per language but you are welcome to submit one story in French AND one story in Spanish if you would like to. Your submission should be uploaded as a Word document or PDF.

The deadline for submissions is noon on Thursday 31st March 2023.

Please note that, because of GDPR, teachers cannot enter on their students’ behalf: students must submit their entries themselves.

If you have any questions, please email us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk.

Bonne chance à tous! ¡Buena suerte a todos!

Dante700 Competition – Winners announced!

2021 marked the 700th anniversary of Dante Alighieri’s death. To honour this occasion, colleagues in the Sub-Faculty of Italian set up the University of Oxford’s Dante700 Competition. In its aim to introduce Dante and his work to students of all ages in a fun and engaging way, the competition invited primary and secondary school pupils to submit a visual response, a poem, or prose piece to a given canto or to Dante’s Commedia as a whole.

The Dante700 Competition ran from December 2021 until April 2022

Our judges were extremely impressed with the hard work and creativity that went into every entry. On behalf of the judging panel, Professor Simon Gilson commented the following about all of the submissions to the competition:

We had a wonderfully rich array of entries but were particularly impressed by the winning students’ engagement with Dante. It was really remarkable to see the variety and quality of the students’ own creative responses across a range of media, in prose, verse, and various art forms. I learned a great deal from how their responses reframed Dante. The competition truly helped us to see how perennially fascinating Dante’s works, ideas and images remain for students of all ages today.

We received over 50 submissions to the competition across the different themes and age categories, from which the following pupils were selected as winners, receiving certificates as well as exclusive prizes kindly supported by Moleskine:

Ulysses – KS2/3 (age 7-14):
Matilda White, Year 6, Birch Church of England Primary School

Lucifer – KS3/4 (age 11-16):
Jack Cotton, Year 9, Bexley Grammar School
Gabriella Akanbi, Year 8, Bexley Grammar School
Selasi Amenyo, Year 8, Bexley Grammar School
Holly Filer, Year 8, Bexley Grammar School
Tarin Houston, Year 9, Bexley Grammar School

Limbo – KS4/5 (age 15-18):
Freddy Chelsom, Year 12, Abingdon School

Open response (all ages):
Zara Jessa, Year 11, Nottingham High School
Eden Murphy, Year 10, James Allen’s Girls’ School
Cara Bossom, Year 12, Francis Holland School

To celebrate our competition winners, we were delighted to hold a small online prize giving ceremony on Tuesday 4October via Microsoft Teams. Led by Professor Gilson and joined by teachers and parents, the event provided a wonderful opportunity to showcase the diverse winning entries and talk to the students about what attracted them to the competition and to Dante’s writings more generally.

In addition to the online event, Dr Caroline Dormor has put together a fantastic virtual anthology of the winning submissions along with the judges’ comments which can be viewed here. Hopefully you will agree that the range of responses to and interpretations of Dante’s writings is truly remarkable!

Huge congratulations to all our winners!

Please note that all educational resources from the competition can still be accessed here.

Prismatic Jane Eyre Schools Project: Resources

The Prismatic Jane Eyre Schools Project (2021–2022) has now come to a close. This was an AHRC-funded joint project between the University of Oxford and the Stephen Spender Trust.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Jane-eyre-1024x244.jpg
Image taken from the Stephen Spender Trust website

On 30 September 2021 — International Translation Day — the nationwide competition was launched. Entrants were asked to compose a poem in a language other than English inspired by a selected passage from Jane Eyre. The competition accepted submissions in any language, and 136 entries were received in 26 languages — including Sindarin, a form of Elvish devised by J. R. R. Tolkien.

Up to 100 entries to the competition have been included in an anthology, which will be published online and in print in September 2022.

The Project drew on translation as an educational tool to explore how Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel has been translated since its publication in 1847 and how its plots and themes can be used as a springboard for new creative works. It comprised of three core activities: a series of translation workshops; a nation-wide translation competition (as mentioned above); and a bank of resources for teachers and pupils.  

The bank of resources aims to allow more young people to enjoy creative translation activities based on Jane Eyre. Initially developed to support entries to the competition, these resources now provide a lasting legacy for the Project.  

Three types of resources are available: 

  1. A handout that outlines an approach to creating a poem from a passage of prose (all languages) 
  2. PowerPoint workshops for teachers to deliver in school with accompanying worksheets (Arabic, French, Polish, Spanish) 
  3. Pupil-led activity worksheets (Arabic, French, Polish, Spanish). 

The Project’s resources are available here and here. To accompany these resources, we’ve created a short video explaining what creative translation is, and why it’s important. The video is available to view below.  

Prismatic Jane Eyre: Translators’ Video

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2022: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y12-13, PART 2)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the first set of highly commended entries for the Year 12-13 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

La libertad, por fin

Photo by Oscar Ivan Esquivel Arteaga on Unsplash

Para Esteban, la vida en la cárcel fue un alivio. Por la primera vez en su vida, no tenía responsabilidades. Sin alquiler. Sin seguro de coche. Nada de pasear al perro. Nada de problemas. Ahora, Esteban era feliz y libre. Aún más, estaba libre de Paula. Había llevado demasiados años para que él se dé cuenta del prisionero que había sido en el exterior. Y aunque la prisión fuera severa para sus amigos, Esteban conocía la verdad del adagio: las circunstancias extremas exigen medidas extremas. Además, estaría fuera en unos años, y solo él sabía dónde estaba enterrado el dinero.

Aarav Ganguli, Year 12

Photo by Darinka Kievskaya on Unsplash

Atrapada

Me persiguió por la habitación con una expresión furiosa y un comportamiento aterrador. Corrí por cada rinconcito, siempre un paso por delante de los monstruosos gritos que salían de su boca. Como si estuviera en una misión para capturar a un ladrón, continuó mirando con esa mirada de fuego. “Te atraparé”, dijo. De repente saltando sobre mí como un guepardo capturando a su presa, me levantó. Su rostro estaba contorsionado por la ira y el estrés, mirando mis ojos inocentes con los suyos llameantes.
“Toto, Estas mal comportada” y “dejalo” me regañó.
Creo que quitaré los trajes de mi lista de juguetes para masticar.


Marina Michelli-Marsden, Year 12

Photo by Jay Mantri on Unsplash

Monumento

Ninguna luz podía llegar al bosque. El sol se oscureció y luego
desapareció por completo- tan mucho que dudas de que hubiera estado
allí en absoluto. En cada árbol colosal se talló un nombre, estiramiento
alrededor del tronco como un niño extiende sus brazos alrededor de su
madre, desesperada por la seguridad que aporta. La madre naturaleza
se preocupa por ellos ahora. En este monumento a los muertos sin
duelo por las mentes humanas, sus nombres la estropean
permanentemente mientras asume la carga de su recuerdo. Otra caída;
otro crece, y los esconde.
Sus nombres la queman. Llora. Cura.

Libby Rock, Year 12

Los navíos del Mundo Nuevo 

Photo by Raimond Klavins on Unsplash

Habíamos visto fuegos en el aire, fantasmas y espíritus. Dioses benévolos siempre habían venido del agua inconmensurable. Y por eso, reímos cuando vimos los navíos, navegados por barbaros. Caras sucias, barbas largas. Piel increíblemente blanca. Una neblina de sondeo indescifrable.

Se acercaron. Un enjambre, encerrado en metal. Continuamente se tocaban sus cabezas, sus corazones y sus hombros. ¿Un lenguaje? Cuando copiamos su ademán, cayeron de rodillas y lloraron.

Repitieron algo una y otra vez.

Mis labios se contorsionaron en formas extrañas, y dije “Ah-or-a, so-is Cri-stia-nos”

Cuando vieron nuestros pendientes, oí la emisión ‘oro’.

Todavía no sabía lo que significaba.

Anna Couzens, Year 12

Photo by Espen Bierud on Unsplash

La Retirada

Con una sonrisa tenue brilla el tono ópalo de la luz de la luna, compartiendo su cielo con las estrellas llorosas, solo separados por el vacío interminable de la galaxia. Pequeñas hogueras iluminan las montañas con un resplandor infernal y atrevido, y los dedos largos de la llama exponen las caras vacías de los que huyen. Con los pies tan entumecidos como sus corazones, el dolor de su pasado brilla como lágrimas en los ojos. Agarrando sus chales y abrigos, intentan en vano, amainar el lacerante frío y batallan contra las garras de la muerte.


Matilda Lawson, Year 12

¡ Felicidades a todos!

********

MFL Teachers – don’t forget! You can:

  • Sign up to our mailing list here to get updates about our schools events and activities, and for a chance to win £100 of vouchers for your department;
  • Learn more about and book on to our MFL Teachers’ Conference (23-24 September) here.

    Any questions: contact us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2022: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y12-13, PART 1)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the first set of highly commended entries for the Year 12-13 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

            Buenos Aires, julio de 1977

Photo by Pavel Neznanov on Unsplash

El lunes, yo vi a un fantasma.

Miraba el atardecer por la ventana, cuando apareció repentinamente en aquella propiedad sombría frente a mi casa. Todo encapuchadito, sin rostro, siendo empujado por dos polis que lo llevaban al sótano del edificio. Mi mamá me dijo que dejara de decir bobadas. ‘¿No conocés la historia de Pinocho?’ me regañó, pero te lo juro que le vi y que oí su llanto espeluznante por la noche. Me quedo esperando para ver si habrá otros fantasmas. Anteayer hubo uno, ayer dos y hoy tres.

Todos entran, pero ningún sale. 


Adam Noad, Year 12

Ahogamiento

Photo by Stormseeker on Unsplash

Supresión. Estremecimiento. Miedo.

Agua fría envolvió su cuerpo. El frío le arrastró a las profundidades del mar. Las mortíferas olas se alzaron sobre el joven. Miedo recorrió su cuerpo como un rayo que no lo soltaba. Una ola gigantesca se lo tragó y cayó la oscuridad. Cuando abrió los ojos y trató de respirar, solamente pudo percibir vagamente que se hundía cada vez más. Sus gritos de auxilio fueron inútiles. La profundidad del mar se lo había tragado para siempre. La vida puede ser nuestro mayor oponente: todo forma parte de la huida del ahogamiento en pensamientos desagradables.

Supresión. Estremecimiento. Miedo.


Nicole Puhr, Year 12

Photo by Brian Yurasits on Unsplash

Soy una cuchara de plástico.

Fui hecha en China. Comprada en Amazon. Volada al Inglaterra. Conducida con cientos de las mías a una escuela.

Recogida por un niño emocionado. Dejada por un niño emocionado. Tirado a la papelera por un profesor cansado.

La bolsa estaba rota. Fui dejada en la calle. Transportada en un río por la lluvia. Llevada al mar por la corriente.

Eso fue hace años.

Las olas me han desgastada. Pero sigo aquí. Los pájaros y los peces me han comida. Pero sigo allí.


Debería sentirme mal. Pero no siento nada.

Porque soy una cuchara de plástico.

Toni Agbede, Year 12

La Mar

Photo by Michael Olsen on Unsplash


El miedo me ha envuelto. Tenía una tarea. Una tarea imposible. La brisa marina salada mordió mi cara, ordenándome que tuviera éxito. La naturaleza se ha convertido no sólo en mi señora, sino también mi torturadora en este barco. Las olas turquesas acarician el barco. Quiero unirme a su reino azul.

“¡Capitán, concéntrese!”

Una tarea imposible.

Las balas de lluvia aporrean la cubierta del barco. La verdadera ira de la mar. Me palpita la cabeza. Nuestro destino es desconocido.

Negar su exigencia sería imposible. Sus ojos de azul zafiro perforan mi alma.

Me someto a ella. 

Polly O’Sullivan, Year 12

Photo by Nsey Benajah on Unsplash

El marinero, tratando de mantenerse despierto, cuenta las constelaciones, pintadas por el universo para guiarlo.

Un silencio escalofriante, roto solo por olas oscuras que empujan su barco hacia adelante.

De repente, una voz de miel llena el aire salado. La canción espectral rueda, como un tsunami, hacia el marinero, y gira dulcemente su cabeza hacia el océano.

Entonces la ve. Sus ojos apenas por encima de las olas, brillando más que la Estrella del Norte, lo orientan hacia ella.

Se zambulle, luego grita mientras el océano llena sus pulmones, y desaparece en las aguas negras.

Todo vuelve al silencio.

Daria Pershina, Year 12

¡ Felicidades a todos!

********

MFL Teachers – don’t forget! You can:

  • Sign up to our mailing list here to get updates about our schools events and activities, and for a chance to win £100 of vouchers for your department;
  • Learn more about and book on to our MFL Teachers’ Conference (23-24 September) here.

    Any questions: contact us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

FRENCH FLASH FICTION 2022: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y12-13, PART 2)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the second and final set of highly commended entries for the Year 12-13 category of this year’s French Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, allez, on y va!

Les Chutes

Photo by Ramy on Unsplash

‘Il est temps!’, j’entends.

Je souris. Enfin, le dernier spectacle arrive.

Je lève les yeux vers le ciel, constellé d’étoiles lumineuses. Elles flottent au-dessus du sol lourd et ténébreux: un jardin des lys enneigés et perles de la mer. Le lac scintille, vitreux du reflet de la lune arrondie.

Le temps s’arrête, suspendu comme dans un songe.

Soudain, un cri perce la quiétude.

Je me fige, ne sachant pas, n’osant pas regarder en l’air. Encore- ‘Regardez là-haut’!

Et puis, je vois, fuyant leurs places, une à une, les étoiles tombant du ciel.

Cette fois, je n’entends rien.


Lucy Fan, Year 12

Photo by Towfiqu Barbhuiya on Unsplash

Une cave. Les murs sont illuminés d’une lueur provenant des rangées de fromage aux croûtes brillantes.

Un groupe de femmes dont les parapluies font un nuage menaçant entrent dans la cave.

« Allez, » en hisse une, puis il y a un mouvement rapide comme les parapluies indiquent à un des fromages. La pièce se remplit soudain d’une lumière sous-marine.

La sorcière met le fromage, malodorant et recouvert d’une couche infâme, au sol.

Un cercle l’entoure. Les femmes baissent leurs parapluies. Un murmure guère audible:

« Bleu. » Elles se prosternent devant le fromage malveillant. « Dieu. »


Carmen Gessell, Year 13

Photo by Diana Vyshniakova on Unsplash

L’espoir

La veuve se leva impatiemment pour prendre la position qui lui était réservée sur le quai. Ses mains, qui reposaient sur la clôture entre la voie ferrée et la gare, s’agrippaient à son drapeau ukrainien – aussi bleu que jaune – qui claquait au vent. Devant elle, il y avait des fleurs qui s’étaient fanées lors du printemps sec. De loin, elle entendit le grondement du train, rempli de ceux qui étaient prêts à recommencer leur vie. Dès que le train fut arrivé, elle y courut, avide d’accueillir ces réfugiés à un pays oublieux des horreurs de la guerre.

Thomas Hilditch, Year 12

Un hommage à l’Ukraine

Photo by Marjan Blan on Unsplash

Un sentiment de tristesse imprègne mon âme lorsque je perçois le spectre de l’abomination de la Guerre Froide. Poussière et cendres sur mes paupières. Crainte et trouble dans mon esprit. Un sentiment croissant de colère et un sentiment déclinant d’appartenance et d’identité. Mon âme tremble de terreur devant les coups de feu, et mon sentiment d’affolement se mêle à ceux des personnes qui cherchent un abri. Assis dans l’ombre, je constate le vide des cieux et la lune enveloppée d’obscurité, et je fais témoinage du bref moment de silence qui précède les atroces bruits des éclats et les cris.

Betina Tello-Peirce, Year 12

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

En courant dans la salle de classe d’histoire, Clementine a dérangé le leçon pour lequel elle était en retard. 

‘Je suis très désolée Monsieur, mais le bus est tombé en panne et je devais courir mais puis il a commencé pleuvoir des cordes, donc –’

Arrête Clémentine, ça suffit.  Si j’avais un centime pour chaque excuse que tu me donnes, je serais un homme riche.  Maintenant, assieds-toi.  Alors, pour continuer, dites tout haut vos reines préférées.  Louise commencera.

‘Marie Antoinette.’

‘Et toi, Béatrice ?’

‘Aliénor d’Aquitaine.’

‘Clémentine ?’

Clémentine, qui n’avait pas écouté aux autres filles, a dit : ‘Rudolf’.


Harriet Tyler, Year 12

Félicitations tout le monde!

********

MFL Teachers – don’t forget! You can:

  • Sign up to our mailing list here to get updates about our schools events and activities, and for a chance to win £100 of vouchers for your department;
  • Learn more about and book on to our MFL Teachers’ Conference (23-24 September) here.

    Any questions: contact us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

FRENCH FLASH FICTION 2022: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y12-13, PART 1)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the first set of highly commended entries for the Year 12-13 category of this year’s French Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, allez, on y va!

Photo by Marc-Olivier Jodoin on Unsplash

Le loup

Je me suis réveillée à temps pour ces heures avant l’aurore quand j’ai l’impression d’être la seule personne au monde. Je suis partie de la maison silencieusement – toujours dans le brouillard du sommeil. La lourdeur de ce sommeil m’a gardé au chaud alors que je me suis approchée du lac. J’ai imaginé le loup dont maman m’avait parlée, « si tu ne te couches pas, il te mangera » et puis… il était là, debout sur la plaine de glace. J’ai lu ses yeux jaunes et demandé, « tu vas me manger? ». Il m’a regardé profondément – il n’a pas répondu.

Rose Bourdier, Year 12

Le vrai moi

Photo by Marc-Olivier Jodoin on Unsplash

J’essaie de vous montrer le vrai moi. Mais où est-il ?

Parfois je souhaite que le vrai moi soit écrit en gras sur mon front. Parce que j’ai ce poids qui m’écrase. Pourtant il pourrait être retiré juste comme ça. Cela semble facile mais les mots qui tentent de sortir de ma bouche sont enchaînés à quelque chose d’inconnu. Peut-être des doutes, des angoisses, de la honte.

Quand lâcherai-je prise ?

Je suis trans.

Pouvez-vous me voir maintenant ? Ou l’ignorance obscurcit-elle encore votre vision ? Parce qu’il est là.


Ellen Burton, Year 12

Photo by Timon Studler on Unsplash

De la gauche, un homme avec les poids du monde sur ses épaules. Du côté droit, une adolescente traversant son premier chagrin d’amour. Assis sur le banc, un mari aux prises avec un divorce déchirant. Le long du chemin, une veuve en deuil de la perte de son premier amour. Tous au même endroit au même moment. Une respiration synchronisée. Le silence. Après un moment calme, une par une ils disparaissent lentement de retour à la bousculade de leurs vies.

Jasmine Channa, Year 12

Le petit garçon

Photo by Ksenia Makagonova on Unsplash

Des larmes coulaient sur son visage alors qu’il traversait la frontière. Ses vêtements étaient déchirés et ses petites bottes étaient couvertes de boue. Les sirènes hurlaient en arrière-plan et les avions rugissaient dans le ciel. Le garçon continuait à pleurer ; chaque fois qu’il faisait un pas, cela lui faisait mal. Sa maison avait été détruite et il était seul. Il n’avait personne. Un vieux sac accroché à son dos avec rien d’autre qu’une photo fissurée de sa famille à l’intérieur. Il a traversé la frontière et est tombé sur le sol. Les pleurs n’ont pas arrêté.

Charlie Cross, Year 12

Photo by Dirk Ribbler on Unsplash

‘Mathieu!’ crie une voix proche. Mathieu a l’air confus – il n’a pas la lumière à tous les étages.

‘Je suis ici, Mathieu. Écoutez mon problème.’

‘C’est mauvais,’ quelqu’un d’autre dit. ‘As-tu besoin d’un avocat?’

Mathieu part précipitamment; il sait quoi faire.

En trouvant encore son ami, il dépose un petit fruit noir.

‘Voilà!’

‘C’est quoi?’

‘C’est un avocat!’


Sascha Entwistle, Year 12

Félicitations tout le monde!

********

MFL Teachers – don’t forget! You can:

  • Sign up to our mailing list here to get updates about our schools events and activities, and for a chance to win £100 of vouchers for your department;
  • Learn more about and book on to our MFL Teachers’ Conference (23-24 September) here.

    Any questions: contact us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2022: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y7-11, PART 2)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the second and final set of highly commended entries for the Year 7-11 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Here are the final stories – disfrutad!

Photo by ammar sabaa on Unsplash

Mi corazón latía muy rápido.

Corrí lo más rápido que pude, me dolían las piernas, pero no me detuve. No pude. Me agaché en un callejón y me quedé allí.

Respiré demasiado rapido.

Sombras altas aparecieron en la calle. Me levanté y corrí de nuevo.

Mi cabeza y mi corazón latían juntos como dos tambores.

Me escondí detrás de dos contenedores negros. Cuando dejé de jadeando fuertemente, el silencio era ensordecedor. No habia lugar para esconderse.


En ningún lugar.

Escuché que algo se movía. Y alguien me agarró.

“¡Te encontré!”

¡Qué lástima! Ahora era mi turno de contar.


Julia Chermanowicz, Year 8

La hermana pequeña

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

Oscuridad.  Silencio. Frío.  Escondida sin brazos, sin piernas.  Soy tan indefensa como un bebé en el útero pero este útero no puede protegerme. 

Mis hermanas curvilíneas con sus mejillas rosadas y sus pestañas opulentes.  Qué perfectas.  Parecen presumidas, caras pintadas y ropa hermosa, floriada.  Es verdad que soy celosa.

Siempre soy querida. Nunca soy respetada porque todo el mundo dice que soy la más mona y la más mimosa.  Pero tengo que esperar en la oscuridad hasta que los gritos de mis hermanas terminen.  Abiertas a la fuerza, por las manos impacientes, finalmente la luz.  Soy el bebé muñeca rusa.

Lilia Perry, Year 8

Photo by Emin BAYCAN on Unsplash

Simplemente comprometido y extraordinariamente agudo e inteligente. Nadie podía ser tan despiadado como él – un adversario hábil.

Había perfeccionado su técnica, podía eliminar al enemigo sin dejar rastro. Su pasión era sostener el cuchillo; no necesitaba ninguna ayuda – él era autosuficiente.

Pero hoy, se sintió cansado mientras veía secarse la sangre.

¿Se estaba volviendo viejo?

Mientras pensaba, la puerta de su oficina se abrió lentamente con un chirrido. Escuchó la voz aguda de la enfermera. “Tu paciente en Terapia Intensiva se ha recuperado. ¿Otra vida salvada, eh? Ella rió.

El cáncer todavía tenía una batalla trascendental que ganar…

Ayesha Nusrath, Year 10

Photo by Lewis Parsons on Unsplash

El año pasado, mi familia fue de vacaciones y me dejó en casa. Me sentí sola. Decidí irme de vacaciones solo, fuí a la casa de vecinos. Primero fuí a casa de Diana, hice mucho ruido fuera de su puerta. Ella me dio de comer, era pescado. Cuando estaba llena, fuí a pasear por mi casa. De repente me sentí cansada, comencé a pensar sobre cómo mi familia me dejaría fuera y no me lleves de vacaciones. No es justo, mis hermanos fueron a Barbado, Francia e Italia e ir nada y jugar voleibol. Después de todo, soy una gato.

Caitlin McGowan, Year 9

Photo by Jordy Meow on Unsplash

Fue noche. La Luna era una cuchilla afilada en el cielo, y las nubes me parecían monstruos; animales feroces con un hambre insaciable para la violencia. Acabó de empezar a llover.  Estaba dando un paseo en una calle tranquila, pero llena de edificios destruidos, llena de familias llorando para sus parientes que habían dejado la Tierra. Podía oír pistolas al fondo, y el olor a sangre me dio miedo. 

La guerra cuesta mucho. Cuesta mucho para la gente, para los soldados luchando para sus países y para el mundo. No puedo decir mucho en cien palabras, pero por favor, dejéis.

Pragvansh Bhatt, Year 11

¡ Felicidades a todos!

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2022: The Highly Commended Entries (Y7-11, Part 1)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the first set of highly commended entries for the Year 7-11 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

Photo by Aditya Saxena on Unsplash

Julia tenia una bufanda que le encantaba y le hizo feliz. Era muy bonita; roja, azul et verde. Luego, un día, se fue volando. La bufanda voló por un tiempo y aterrizó en un niño pequeño triste en Londres. La bufando se quedo con él por un día y después de hacerlo feliz, se fue volando otra vez. En españa, la bufanda aterrizó en una niña llorando y la hace feliz otra vez. Por última vez, voló de nuevo a Francia. Este vez se encuentra Julia y se queda con ella. Las cosas siempre vuelven si está destinado a ser.

Sofia Smith, Year 10

Photo by Fuu J on Unsplash

Hipnótico. Su voz me arulla de un lado para otro como olas de suaves en un día de verano. De un lado para otro, nuestro conversación baja y fluye. Las rocas se sientan inocentemente cerca de la costa, espectadoras a nuestro amor.

Ella me lleva más cerca.

Los ojos inquietante ellos me atreviendo a apercarse. Las mejillas fríos y sonrojadas. Más cerca. El pelo cascada se enreda firmemente por todo mis extremidades. Asifixante. Como un puño enorme, las olas golpean contra las rocas. Salvaje y despiadada. Audiblemente rompiendo mis huesos.

Nunca confías en los ruidos que escuchas en el mar.

Isabella Rickard, Year 11

Photo by Denys Nevozhai on Unsplash

El Invierno

Solo pueden amarse unos a otros en el invierno. A medida que las hojas caían de los árboles, su amor florecía. Muchas noches de conversación llevaron a cenas a la luz de las velas. Se abrazaban cuando las noches eran frías y largas. Sin embargo, cuando el cielo comenzó a iluminarse y el aire llevó la dulzura de la emoción del verano, su amor se vio obligado a detenerse. Pero como hacen los amantes, esperaron en tándem el uno al otro. Siempre prometiendo que no se separarían el uno del otro el próximo invierno.

Roxy Cole, Year 9

Photo by Jeremy Hynes on Unsplash

–¡Pero veo una ardilla! ¡Mira… hay su cola desapareciendo en el árbol!

Corro frenéticamente hacia mi humano. Me mira perplejamente. Una vez más, no entiende la enormidad de la situación. Las ardillas, mi archienemigos, son criaturas salvajes pero engañan a mi humano para que crea que son lindos…

–Max, deja de ladrar. ¡Es solo una ardilla!

Pero, no sabe lo que nosotros los perros sabemos. Las ardillas planean destruir nuestro territorio, un jardín cada vez.

–¡Rápido, la ardilla está escapando! ¡Tengo que decírselo a mi humano! ¡Es mi trabajo proteger mi jardín!

Max, silencio por favor.


Y otra ardilla escapa…

Poppy Rhodes, Year 11

La chica en el espejo

Photo by Taylor Smith on Unsplash

Estoy mirando a una chica que he visto antes. La odio.

Sus gafas se sientan en la punta de su nariz y las hacen más grandes sus ojos. Tiene los dientes más amarillos que la mantequilla, que salen de su boca. La piel en su cara redonda está roja gracias a tantos granitos. 

La ropa que lleva es vieja y sin estilo. Su camiseta es demasiada pequeña para esconder su estómago, y de un verde claro. Los vaqueros que tiene están muy sucios.

Con lágrimas en los ojos, me alejo del espejo.

Reema Hindocha, Year 10

¡ Felicidades a todos!

FRENCH FLASH FICTION 2022: The Highly Commended Entries (Y7-11, Part 2)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the second and final set of highly commended entries for the Year 7-11 category of this year’s French Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, allez, on y va!

Photo by Nikolas Noonan on Unsplash

Là où la tornade avait balayé les routes, une destruction que le monde ne savait pas qu’elle pouvait posséder, dévastant une terre de lumière, de vie ou d’ennemis, la laissant aspirer à des voix et au bruit des pieds, à part les yeux pleurant pour apercevoir les corps, les oiseaux chantaient un chant lugubre, les fleurs s’agenouillaient puis s’inclinaient, les branches mortes des arbres suivaient le vent, traçant un chemin pour que les feuilles volent et déchaînent leurs ailes, parmi les pétales blancs laiteux tourbillonnant dans le ciel, c’est là que j’ai trouvé la lettre de la fille perdue.

Chaitanya Sapra, Year 10

Photo by Steve Johnson on Unsplash

Une fois, il y avait quelque chose sur lequel tout le monde se concentrait toujours. Cet objet était rond et fatigué des gens qui le regardaient toujours. Cet article s’ennuyait toujours et ne pouvait que continuer à bouger, d’où la raison pour laquelle il était si fatigué. Il voulait prendre le relais mais ne pouvait pas. C’était coincé. Sur un mur. Ce gadget n’aimait pas être une horloge. Il voulait avoir la liberté comme les fleurs ou les pissenlits. L’horloge a cessé de bouger et s’est rendu compte à quel point elle s’ennuyait encore plus, alors elle était heureuse d’être une horloge et a continué à tourner.

Heba Shahzad, Year 8

Un village ukrainien

Photo by Levi Meir Clancy on Unsplash

Les champs, où elle a passé plusieurs journées ensoleillées à jouer sont criblés de balles. Des missiles meurtriers se cachent parmi l’herbe, et attendent leur victime. Le souffle des explosions met le village en ruines. Au loin, elle peut, à peine, distinguer les soldats qui se précipitent vers les maisons. Le ciel nocturne est aussi clair qu’en plein jour, illuminé par les flammes.

En fermant les yeux, elle imagine un monde pacifique, un monde qu’elle est sûre elle reverra; les tanks sont capables de détruire son foyer, mais pas son espoir.


Anna Skrypina, Year 10

Le Diable de Park Lane

Photo by Kathy Marsh on Unsplash

En jugeant la forme maigre du garçon d’en haut, j’ai arboré ma meilleure expression de supériorité alors qu’il cherchait frénétiquementdans sa poche pour trouver l’argent qu’il me devait. Mon propre frère; en faillite, sans domicile. Il était la quintessence de pitoyable.

‘100 dollars de plus’, j’ai dit de façon moqueuse, son visage se contorsionnait avec un soupir de réticence douloureuse alors qu’il me remettait tout l’argent qui lui restait.

Mes yeux brillants de dollars, j’ai savouré le goût délicieux de la dominance. Peut-être suis-je impitoyable. Mais, qui a besoin de gentillesse quand vous êtes le gagnant du Monopoly?


Gabriella Sweeney, Year 11

Le Président

Photo by Margaret Jaszowska on Unsplash

C’était minuit, quand tout le monde dormait. Les gnomes se sont empilés l’un sur l’autre pour grimper au réfrigérateur… ils cherchaient le Président. 

Ils se sont balancés les uns sur les chapeaux pointus des autres, et le réfrigérateur à ouvert, dévoilant leur prix. Mais à ce moment, ils sont tombés.

Je me suis réveillée d’un coup, mon cœur battant rapidement. Un rêve, je me disais, mais j’ai décidé de descendre voir pour en être sûre.

En entrant dans la cuisine j’ai vu des morceaux de porcelaine colorée, éparpillés par terre près du réfrigérateur… et un camembert rond en plein milieu.

Lulu Wills, Year 11

Félicitations tout le monde!