Tag Archives: Spanish

Modern Languages Summer School

Applications are now open for Wadham College‘s annual five-day Modern Languages Summer School. The residential will take place at the college, based in the centre of Oxford, from 19th to 23rd August 2024.

Summer schools are designed to give UK pupils studying in Year 12 a taste of what it’s like to be an undergraduate studying at the University of Oxford.  Pupils will take part in an academic programme, live in College, meet student ambassadors studying at Oxford, and receive information, advice and guidance on applying to university. Wadham’s Summer Schools are free and the college will provide financial support to pupils to cover their travel costs.

We’re delighted to be able to run these events in-person allowing participants the best experience of life at the university.  The feedback from last year’s Summer Schools was hugely positive with over a third of participants subsequently securing offers to study at the university.

“After the summer school I am much more confident that I would fit in at Oxford and feel like I am more ready to move away from home”

Summer School participant, 2022

For Modern Languages more specifically, pupils will engage in a seminar series led by Wadham’s language tutors, including language classes in their selected language of study (French, German or Spanish) with opportunities to try other languages as beginners (including German, Portuguese and Russian). Students will complete an assignment on a main topic with feedback from tutors. Pupils will also be able to receive support from current undergraduates and from the College on making successful applications to top universities.   

For more information and to apply, click here: Wadham College Summer Schools. Pupils should be studying French, German or Spanish at A-level or equivalent to apply. Applications close at 5pm on 3rd May.

If you have any queries, please contact access@wadham.ox.ac.uk

Flash Fiction Competitions reminder!

With just two weeks to go until the deadline, there’s still a chance to enter our Flash Fiction Competitions in French and/or Spanish – don’t miss out on your chance to win £100! A reminder of the competition details and how you can enter can be found below…

Credit: Aaron Burden via Unsplash

What is Flash Fiction?

We’re looking for a complete story, written in French or Spanish, using no more than 100 words.

Did you know that the shortest story in Spanish is only seven words long?

Cuando despertó, el dinosaurio todavía estaba allí.
(When he woke up, the dinosaur was still there.)

– Augusto Monterroso Bonilla (1921-2003)

What are the judges looking for?

Our judging panel of academics will be looking for imagination and narrative flair, as well as linguistic ability and accuracy. Your use of French or Spanish will be considered in the context of your age and year group: in other words, we will not expect younger pupils to compete against older pupils linguistically. For inspiration, you can read last year’s winning entries for French here, and for Spanish here.

What do I win?

The judges will award a top prize of £100, as well as prizes of £25 to a maximum of two runners up, in each age category. Certificates will also be awarded to pupils who have been highly commended by our judges. Results as well as the winning, runner up, and highly commended stories will be published on this blog, if entrants give us permission to do so.

How do I enter?

You can submit your story via our online forms at the links below.

FrenchSpanish
Years 7-9Years 7-9
Years 10-11Years 10-11
Years 12-13Years 12-13

Click on the links to be taken to the correct submission form for your age/year group.

You may only submit one story per language but you are welcome to submit one story in French AND one story in Spanish if you learn or study both languages. Your submission should be uploaded as a Word document or PDF.

The deadline for submissions is 12 noon on Wednesday 27th March 2024.

Due to GDPR, teachers cannot enter on their students’ behalf: students must submit their entries themselves.

Please note that the competition has changed slightly this year. We are now only accepting entries from UK secondary school pupils.

If you have any questions, please check our FAQs here. If these still don’t answer your question(s), please email us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk.

Bonne chance à tous! ¡Buena suerte a todos!

UNIQ Applications still open

Every year UNIQ helps change the lives of young people, helping them to get into Oxford and other highly-selective universities. Apply now to take part!

What is UNIQ?

UNIQ is the University of Oxford’s access programme for UK state school students. It prioritises places for students with good grades from backgrounds that are under-represented at Oxford and other universities. Every year more students from diverse backgrounds get offered places at Oxford with help from UNIQ.

In terms of Modern Languages, we will be offering courses for French, Spanish and German again this year, all of which include the opportunity to taste two beginners’ languages.

UNIQ offers:

  • online support through the application process
  • a residential at an Oxford college for most participants
  • a trip to an Oxford open day for another 250 participants

UNIQ is completely free: accommodation, meals, academic courses, social activities, and travel are all included.

Every year students use their experiences on UNIQ to help inform their university choices and to make successful applications. UNIQ students who apply to Oxford have a higher rate of success than other applicants.

How to apply

UNIQ prioritises state school students with good grades from backgrounds that are under-represented at Oxford and other highly selective universities. UNIQ welcomes applications from:

  • Year 12 students from England and Wales in the first year of A level studies or equivalent
  • Year 13 students from Northern Ireland in the first year of A level studies or equivalent
  • S5 students from Scotland studying Highers or equivalent

We use criteria such as experience of being in care, eligibility for Free School Meals, and information associated with the area that you live in to prioritise who comes on UNIQ.

Find out more and apply here! Applications close at noon on 23rd January 2024.

FRENCH AND SPANISH FLASH FICTION COMPETITIONS NOW OPEN!

We’re delighted to announce the return of our ever-popular French and Spanish Flash Fiction competitions for UK secondary school pupils. If you are learning French and/or Spanish in Years 7-13, you are invited to send us a *very* short story to be in with a chance of winning up to £100! Read on to find out more…

Credit: Aaron Burden via Unsplash

What is Flash Fiction?

We’re looking for a complete story, written in French or Spanish, using no more than 100 words.

Did you know that the shortest story in Spanish is only seven words long?

Cuando despertó, el dinosaurio todavía estaba allí.
(When he woke up, the dinosaur was still there.)

– Augusto Monterroso Bonilla (1921-2003)

What are the judges looking for?

Our judging panel of academics will be looking for imagination and narrative flair, as well as linguistic ability and accuracy. Your use of French or Spanish will be considered in the context of your age and year group: in other words, we will not expect younger pupils to compete against older pupils linguistically. For inspiration, you can read last year’s winning entries for French here, and for Spanish here.

What do I win?

The judges will award a top prize of £100, as well as prizes of £25 to a maximum of two runners up, in each age category. Certificates will also be awarded to pupils who have been highly commended by our judges. Results as well as the winning, runner up, and highly commended stories will be published on this blog, if entrants give us permission to do so.

How do I enter?

You can submit your story via our online forms at the links below.

FrenchSpanish
Years 7-9 Years 7-9
Years 10-11 Years 10-11
Years 12-13 Years 12-13
Click on the links to be taken to the correct submission form for your age/year group.

You may only submit one story per language but you are welcome to submit one story in French AND one story in Spanish if you learn or study both languages. Your submission should be uploaded as a Word document or PDF.

The deadline for submissions is 12 noon on Wednesday 27th March 2024.

Due to GDPR, teachers cannot enter on their students’ behalf: students must submit their entries themselves.

Please note that the competition has changed slightly this year. We are now only accepting entries from UK secondary school pupils.

If you have any questions, please check our FAQs here. If these still don’t answer your question(s), please email us at schools.liaison@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk.

Bonne chance à tous! ¡Buena suerte a todos!

Anthea Bell Prize for Young Translators

The Anthea Bell Prize for Young Translators is a creative translation competition for students aged 11-18 studying French, German, Italian, Mandarin and Spanish. The competition also runs from French into Welsh. The Prize is free to enter and open to all schools across the UK. 

The 2023-24 prize launches today (20 September), when creative translation teaching packs will be shared with teachers in time for European Day of Languages on 26 September and International Translation Day on 30 September. These teaching packs are designed to help teachers bring creative translation into the MFL classroom as well as to help students prepare for the competition task.

Don’t worry if you have not yet registered! There is still plenty of time for teachers to do so as the competition itself will run over several weeks from 5 February to 28 March 2024. Area and national winners will be announced in May or June 2023. They will receive certificates and national winners will receive book prizes.

Over 15,000 students participated in the competition in 2023: see the list of winners and commendations in 2023.  For those registered, teaching packs for poetry translation will be circulated today, fiction will follow after October half term, and non-fiction will be released in early January.  Register to receive these resources and for updates about the competition task, click here

There are a number of related activities run by the Queen’s Translation Exchange that teachers and pupils can participate in, details of which can be found here.

If you have any queries regarding the competition, please contact the Translation Exchange team at translation.exchange@queens.ox.ac.uk.

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2023: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y12-13)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the highly commended entries for the Year 12-13 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

La Mujer

La estatua está sola en el patio de un palacio, suspendida en piedra para siempre. Su expresión es apacible y sonriente, con los brazos extendidos, su vestido que fluye. La Mujer la llaman, por no tenía nombre. Un símbolo perfecto de la feminidad, de silencio, de los oprimidos.

Antes era diferente. En vida estaba una fuerza de la naturaleza, con los ojosbrillantes de desafío, sus dientes al descubierto de furia incalificable. Sus uñas se hincaron en las palmas, dejaron semilunas en sus estelas; vestido rasgado, ensangrentado. La Bruja la llamaban y la evitaban.

– Romilly De Silva, Year 12

«Tenemos que decirte algo, cariño».

En esta fracción de segundo, mi vida se ha puesto patas arriba. Me senté, chocada por esta revelación. Millones de pensamientos daban vueltas en mi cabeza, y unas lágrimas corrían por mi rostro, como un océano de dolor.

Todo lo que pensé que sabía era una mentira.

Es sorprendente que nunca lo haya adivinado. Los secretos, los papeles ocultos, la falta de fotos de mi infancia. Hubiera debido saber que me escondian algo. Pero nunca en mis sueños me pude imaginar que estaban guardando semejante secreto. El secreto de mi existencia.

Soy un niño robado.

– Meghan Henderson, Year 12

Hay una voz en mi cabeza. Te prometo que no estoy loca- se llama ‘inglés’. A veces ojalá no viviera aquí. Quiero correr de él, pero estamos atrapados juntos. Mientras escribo esto, inglés’ traduce y temo que siempre lo haga. Mi corazón quiere creer que entiendo las palabras y en principio sé lo que significan, pero no las siento. Son un concepto y no una realidad. Son un revoltijo de letras y sonidos que me han dicho que significan algo para alguien, hacen que alguien se sienta algo. Ojalá yo fuera ese alguien pero ‘inglés’ siempre será en mi cabeza.

– Martha Burdon, Year 12

La sopa es una comida complicada. Hay personas que dicen que la sopa tiene todas las respuestas. Dicen que si la miras atentamente, encontrarás las soluciones – ni demasiado cortas, ni demasiado largas. Dicen que la sopa tiene todas las informaciones necesarias. Si necesitas suerte, alegría, esperanza – puedes encontrarlas. Pero en mi sopa solo veo las verduras. No sé qué estoy haciendo mal.

Cada vez que voy al supermercado, busco por todas partes la sopa especial. Encuentro sopa de tomate, sopa de pollo – ¡incluso el gazpacho! Pero no sé dónde encontrar la sopa que necesito. La sopa de letras.

– Lara Horsley, Year 13

¿Ustedes aún han oído?

¿No?, les diré la leyenda de la mujer gitana que conjuró a la luna hasta la madrugada. La gitana rogó a la luna por un hombre gitano hasta que le enviara un cíngaro a condición de que se rindiera su primer hijo, que el gitano engendre, a la luna. Sin embargo, de un padre de piel morena, nació un niño blanco como la nieve fría.

El gitano, al creerse deshonrado, se enfrentó a su  mujer y la hirió de muerte con su cuchillo, en las montañas, rindió al niño albino a la luna de plata blanca.

– Charlie Crookes, Year 12

Sancocho

Cuba es un corazón que late, ritmos sincopados de tumbadoras que te llaman a refrescarte en el río que se arremolina en torno a las raíces de tus antepasados.

Los vendedores, gritando sus negocios a través de brillantes olas de calor. Vestigios de nuestra historia, las calles de Camagüey son un respiro mientras todo lo demás se mueve a su alrededor.

Acuno a mi primo mientras se desangra, un agujero en el pecho, su hermano escogió la pelea equivocada.

Aromas de sangre y humo de cigarro, con tintes de cilantro. La sangre caliente empapa la única camisa que tenía, y recuerdo que su madre estaba haciendo sancocho hoy.

– Edith Scott, Year 12

El Caudillo.

Por las calles de Madrid, nos caza. Cruza las playas de Andalucía, nos persigue. En las montañas vascas, nos silencia. Terror, vestido de blanco, nos agarra por la garganta y mientras morimos, por nuestros respiros finales, un último sabor de libertad, su agarre solo se hace más fuerte hasta que todo lo que queda son cadáveres ambulatorios.

Cadáveres desprovistos de autonomía, que sonríen, vistiendo el pretexto de una España en su antiguo esplendor. 

– Jack Hussey, Year 12

El orgullo es el diablo

Puede apoderarse de cualquiera. Se acerca sigilosamente como la Serpiente del Edén, susurrándote palabras venenosas al oído. Si lo consigue, uno puede ahogarse en un abismo de aislamiento, para no ser visto nunca más. el sentimiento en el que te deja es la peor parte; una presión brutal como un maremoto que nos traga enteros, y algunos se ahogan en su abrazo. ¿Se ha apoderado de ti el orgullo? ¿Se ha acercado a ti como una llama silenciosa hasta que te encontraste luchando contra un fuego furioso? un fuego que te rodea y te separa del mundo.

– Josiane Kammani, Year 12

La sombra del tiempo perdido

Las temporadas se disipan, de entrada y salida- un tarareo dulce. La madre Tierra es la titiritera controlando cómo crece y mengua la luna; su mano compasiva cuidando la naturaleza. Ya sea el viento invernal, azotando con fuerza hercúlea o la melodía tranquila de los pájaros, compartiendo serenata del verano; la metamorfosis sigue. No podemos frenarla ni acelerarla- lo único seguro, un constante en la vida siempre cambiante. Los días son segundos y los meses, horas- quizás las temporadas son una medida de tiempo del mundo, nos prestan claridad y paz infinita; hasta que dejemos que su alma durmiente descanse.

– Eva Murphy, Year 12

¡ Felicidades a todos!

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2023: THE HIGHLY COMMENDED ENTRIES (Y10-11)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the highly commended entries for the Year 10-11 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

La Magnolia 

Ella recuerda el día que plantaron la magnolia. Recuerda la aspereza de su pala, el aroma de la tierra. Recuerda ligeros pasos golpeteando como la lluvia, y el sonido de la risa entrecortada en su oído. Pequeñas botas amarillas, brillando en el lodo. Años después, la magnolia comienza a florecer. Sus capullos se despliegan como puños, revelando pétalos del color de cachetes rubicundos: cachetes que solía besar, hace mucho. El árbol que sobrevivió a su hijita vigila silenciosamente la lápida debajo. A veces, cuando hay viento, la madre puede oír todavía el sonido de la risa, enganchando en la brisa.

– Amelie Huntley, Year 11

El Páramo

Un plano aislado. Las arenas se estiran en la distancia. Ni un solo ser vivo. Como si hubiera sido abandonado. ¿La alegría de colores vibrantes? Ausente. Aparte de la neblina encendida por encima de mí. Rojo sangre. Las cáscaras arrugadas de árboles caídos. Sus raíces imitan la estructura venosa de la Tierra debajo. Muerta. En el horizonte, vi algo pequeño; el marco oxidado y crujiente de un edificio antiguo. La escena gótica delante de mí; talló en el hierro. Permanente. El valle de fuego se extiende más y más, hasta que no queda nada. Nada más que el silencio ensordecedor.

– Carlotta Gray, Year 11

Cebolla

Monda sobre monda. Capa sobre capa. Aro sobre aro. Desplegando su vestimenta violeta, cayendo, una vez fue redonda, ahora no. Enmascarada bajo su belleza óptica, embriagadora, de olor fuerte, trayendo lágrimas que ningún amante, o infeliz, puede darte. Eso es lo que mi madre me dijo.

Creyéndome listo, cierro los ojos, el cuchillo acaricia su piel. Ahora, no me van a escocer los ojos por ti. Un corte rápido, resbalando la hoja afilada, un chorro de calor. Las lágrimas no brotan. Éxito. Pero… siento el escozor. Imposible.

Abro los ojos, solamente para encontrar un corte, sangre brotando de mi dedo.

– DingDing Zhou, Year 10

Se despierta. Mira el reloj. Son las dos de la mañana. Mira alrededor de su habitación. Está oscuro. Sólo su mesa está iluminada por una lámpara de escritorio. Delante de él hay un ordenador portátil. En la pantalla hay un ensayo incompleta, titulada “Mantener una vida estudiantil equilibrada”. Piensa. Recuerda. Entra en pánico. Empieza a teclear. Clic clac. Clic clac. Sube el documento. Pulsa enviar. Son las 3. Se apaga. Se despierta. Mira el reloj. Son las 9. Llega tarde. Entra en pánico. Se pone frenéticamente el uniforme. Tiene prisa. Tropieza en la calle. Cruza corriendo la calle. Choca.

– Ryan Cheung, Year 11

Cada día cuando estoy caminando del colegio veo una niña en el parque. Lleva una mochila rosa con lentejuelas blancos, que brilla en la luz de sol. Pasa tiempo con un grupo de niñas, todos se rieron de ella. Cada día veo ellas en el parque y sé que están haciendo, sin embargo no hago nada ya que demasiado asusto. No quiero ser la próxima víctima. Quiero estar contentos y ajenos a lo que pasa pero, estaremos contentos si no decimos nada?

Mañana no va estar en el parque y pasado mañana el grupo de niñas encontrarán una niña nueva.

– Rhea Sandher, Year 10

Sueños

Dorado. El sol brilla sobre la playa con tanta fuerza que parece resplandecer. Azul. El mar juega consigo mismo, chocando contra la orilla y luego arrastrándose hacia atrás solo para que otra parte de él colapse. Bronce. Mi piel se broncea instantáneamente mientras camino por la playa hacia el agua bajo el sol abrasador. Blanco. Salpito al agua, vientre pegado a mi tabla de surf, deslizándome por la superficie como un avión listo para despegar, haciendo que el océano se convierta en una ráfaga de burbujas detrás de mí. Negro. Oscuridad. ¡Es una pena, se estaba poniendo bueno!

– Prithika Anbezhil, Year 11

El jardin de mi cuerpo

La serenidad me invadió en cuanto entré en el bosque: era una zona preciosa donde el sol brillaba a través de las hojas y los árboles se erguían altos y orgullosos. Entré en el bosque, caminando por un sendero sinuoso mientras una brisa cálida me acariciaba la cara. Mi cuerpo se había entumecido a medida que avanzaba por el sendero, como si estuviera borracho de vino. Mis piernas se habían vuelto rígidas y mis pensamientos parecían haberse quedado en blanco: mi cuerpo se había vuelto leñoso y duro. Estaba encadenado para siempre a este jardín.

– Mustafa Ayub, Year 10

Para la gente común, es impresionante ser pianista. ¿Pero para conseguir un trabajo en la industria? Tuve que tener una habilidad que no era físicamente posible. Así que sí. Es horrible que fingí la lesión. Es escandaloso que continúe este acto. Pero la gente paga mucho dinero para ver a un ciego tocar el piano. Sin embargo, hoy, accidentalmente bajé la guardia- pero no porque de mi conciencia. Porque, cuando mi hermana me dijo que estaba arrastrando la basura afuera, ¿Cómo podría no reaccionar al ver el cuerpo sin vida de su esposo en sus manos?

– Mia White, Year 10

Tan Bueno Como Ella

“Sigue el ejemplo de tu gemela,” ellos dicen. “Sigue sus pasos,” dicen. “Un día serás tan buena como ella,” dicen. Bueno ¿adivina? Estoy harta de ser el segundo mejor. Ella está siempre un paso por delante de mí. ¿Pero sabes la peor parte? ¿Cómo puedo odiarla? Ella es un ángel. Tiene los modales perfectos mientras que tengo un temperamento horrible. Ella es Blancanieves, soy la Reina Malvada. Tiene el alma bella mientras que el mío se pudre dentro. ¿Soy una persona despreciable? Tal vez. ¿Pero puedes decir que no sientes lo mismo si estabas en mi posición?

– Khanh Linh Nguyen, Year 10

¡ Felicidades a todos!

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2023: The Highly Commended Entries (Y7-9)

Following the publication of the winning and runner up entries, we are excited to present the highly commended entries for the Year 7-9 category of this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition!

A huge well done to all our highly commended entrants! Without further ado, ¡venga, vamos!

Tabatha estaba sentada sola en su salón de clases. Sus amigos estaban afuera jugando en los jardines de la escuela mientras Tabatha quería terminar su dibujo. Cuando dibujó los últimos detalles de su tigre, algo le llamó la atención, el animal cobró vida. El tigre fue muy agresivo y le gruñó a Tabatha quien, horrorizada, comenzó a correr fuera de la clase y por el largo y oscuro corredor hasta que llegó al final sin salida. Se dio la vuelta gritando por ayuda y en lugar del tigre, vio a la maestra gritando: ‘¡otra detención Tabby! ¡Basta de este comportamiento!

– Carlotta Elliott, Year 9

Perenne

Un ciclo: las hojas van a la deriva lentamente hacia el suelo para descansar y emergen en las ramas cuando el anhelo de quietud se ha desvanecido. La breve ausencia de movimiento es lo que hace que el ritual sea tan satisfactorio. Existo solamente para este propósito: para el estado intermedio. Ese momento de libertad cuando estás en tu forma más pura. Me encuentro buscando esto en ti. Pero, en lugar de eso, existo como perenne, y ser perenne es perder el significado de ese momento, porque no es un momento sino más que una eternidad.

– Daisy Apfel, Year 9

Memorias Desaparacer

La nieve brilla en la luz. Estoy solo. El aire cálido y pesado es una sensación a la que no estoy acostumbrado, siendo producto de las duras temperaturas. Las últimas semanas han sido agradables, el invierno calma y la brisa suave. Sin embargo, a medida que los días se hacen más largos y empiezo a escuchar el sonido de una dulce risa, sé que mis días están contados y llegando a su fin. Me derrito en la vida de las plantas y las hermosas flores. Un ciclo interminable de vida y muerte. La vida de un muñeco de nieve.

– Dhritya Sagin, Year 9

En el pluviselva tropical de Brasil, una rana sentó en una hoja. Miró hambriento a alrededor, y esperó para una víctima entrar para entrar en el alcance de la rana.

Cuando la rana vio un escarabajito negro, saltó al suelo y lo mató fácilmente. El escarabajito murió instantáneamente. La rana continuó mirar para sus próximas víctimas.

La rana continuó por el suelo del bosque, cuando una serpiente ingente deslizó detrás de le. La rana luchó, pero la serpiente la mató fácilmente.

La serpiente tragó la rana y continuó a través de la pluviselva tropical, mirando para sus próximas víctimas.

– Sona Patel, Year 9

El fin

Miro la línea de meta.
Quiero ganar pero estoy perdiendo.
Quiero llegar, pero tengo una jaqueca palpitante y hay un estanque de dolor en mi estómago.
Quiero correr, pero mis piernas gritando desesperadamente por ayuda. Mis piernas intentan
continuar pero no pueden. Intento continuar pero no puedo.
Quiero, quiero, quiero.
Quiero mucho.
Pero me derrumbo.
Veo a mi entrenadora y ella sonríe pero veo la decepción.
No hay esperanza – tengo perdido; eso es eso. Veo a los otros corredores pasar zumbando y sé.
Para mi, la carrera ha terminado antes de empezar.
El fin.

– Saanvi Dwivedi, Year 8

Mi puesta de sol

El ocaso IIega como un corazón asentado a horizonte, como si el mismo cielo pudiera hablar de amor.Solía ser la puesta de sol en mi horizonte. Observé cada momento, cada minuto y cada segundo mientras el sol se ponía en su vida. Le advertí que no lo hiciera pero aun así lo hizo. Él saltó. Saltó a las profundidades de tinto que lo abrazaron como una madre. Pero nunca volvió a ver a su verdadera madre. Su vida se deslizó entre mis manos como arena. Mi puesta de sol se desvaneció. Mi hijo Pérez se había ido.

– Pooja Vamadevan, Year 9

La lluvia ha dejado de caer, todo lo que queda es viento. A medida que se
avecina la tormenta, veo que el agua comienza a arremolinarse y enroscarse a mi alrededor. Ver ese tornado de agua moverse todavía me fascina: era como si pudiera demoler todo el entorno. Está tomando tanto de los materiales que se ofrecen que el mar circundante se está hundiendo lentamente, detrás de donde puedo ver. Ahora tengo que mirar por encima del borde solo para ver cuán poderosa es esta tormenta. Es tan fascinante que apenas puedo creer que sea real.
Para. La bañera está vacía.

– Niamh Daniels, Year 9

Despertar

Los pájaros cantaban afuera en un maravilloso lugar del sur de Turquía, mientras mi madre me preparaba un chocolate caliente para desayunar. Los árboles se balanceaban y la voz del imán de la mezquita sonaba como una ópera al aire libre. De repente, todo en mi habitacion comenzó a temblar y el edificio a desmoronarse. No tenía ni idea de lo que estaba pasando. Salí corriendo de mi habitación buscando a mi hermano. Lo único que podía escuchar eran gritos y el ruido del derumbamiento. Mi vision empezaba a ponerse borrosa. Dónde estaba mi familia?

– Klara Andonegui, Year 9

¡ Felicidades a todos!

SPANISH FLASH FICTION 2023: THE WINNERS

We’re delighted to publish the winning and runner-up entries for this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition. We’ll also be publishing the highly commended entries for both French and Spanish over the coming weeks.

Thank you and well done to everyone who entered this year’s competition. The Spanish judging panel were extremely impressed with all the entries we received this year (just under 700), and commented the following:

We thoroughly enjoyed reading a diverse selection of short stories for this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition, and we want to thank all the participants who took the time to submit their entries. The remarkable level of creativity and storytelling ability demonstrated was truly impressive, making the task of selecting just twelve winning entries exceptionally challenging. The winning entries stood out to us for their fresh and inventive approaches, thought-provoking reflections, engaging writing styles, and their ability to explore different and often unusual perspectives.

Without further ado, here are the stories! We hope you enjoy reading them as much as the judges did.

YEARS 7-9

WINNER:

Playa al amanecer

Cuando sale el sol a primera hora de la mañana, pintando colores radiantes sobre un lienzo de rocío matutino, las olas me llaman. La arena blanca cruje bajo mis pies, mientras almejas y caracolas decoran la playa con dibujos irregulares. Las palmeras se mecen con la brisa californiana y su aire tropical contribuye a crear un ambiente maravilloso. Los cangrejos ermitaños corretean bajo los guijarros lisos. El rocío del mar me escuece los ojos. La espuma turquesa baña la orilla, cada nostálgica ola más alta que la anterior. Los rayos del sol me quemaban la espalda y el cuello, pero no me importaba. Estaba en casa.

– Ava Saunders, Year 9

RUNNER UP:

Ser un fantasma es agotador, especialmente cuando una persona famosa sabe de ti. La noche nunca es segura, muchos camarógrafos siempre quieren sacar fotos sobre la leyenda de la mujer fría. Odio el fin de mes, como el famoso profeta y algunos turistas suelen venir a la medianoche, entonces yo empiezo mi trabajo silencioso. No más. Después de diez horrosos años, quiero todos los visitos apartados.
“¡Váis a ver la mujer fría en cuatro minutos!” La profeta exclama, ignorar de mí detrás su cuerpo. Rápidamente, levanto la mujer telepáticamente y mi furia se transforma ella en hielo.
Que lástima.

– Lily Messer, Year 9

YEARS 10-11

WINNER:

El Pavo Real

El pavo real extiende su cola tornasolada — sus plumas vistosas fulgurando bajo el foco celestial del sol. Camina dándose aires hacia mí, plenamente consciente de que llama la atención.

Se queda quieto. Sus plumas, sin embargo, todavía se balancean ligeramente. Las manchas azules las adornan como ojos sonrientes. Me guiñan con arrogancia.

Pero mientras se me acerca cautelosamente, veo que las estrellas se atenúan en sus ojos. El alguna vez glorioso prisionero mira solemnemente a través de los barrotes de su celda. Una angosta pasarela. Suavemente su cola tornasolada roza el suelo. Tal vez el desearía no ser tan impresionante.

– Ella Needham, Year 10

RUNNER UP:

En medio del desierto, solía haber un lagarto solitario. Lejos de la sociedad, lejos de todo, el gecko solo quería un amigo, o incluso un grano de arena que podría mostrarle atención. Sin embargo, durante muchos días el pobre lagarto no vio a nadie. Empezaba a perder toda esperanza cuando de repente, vio un pájaro. ¡Qué alegría sintió!

Le vino un golpe de realidad al lagarto. Su alegría se distorsionó rápidamente al comprender las intenciones del pájaro. Su única esperanza de hacer un amigo se desvaneció. – junto con él mismo.

– Shoshi Ellituv, Year 11

YEARS 12-13

WINNER:

Paleta De Colores

Yo era su paleta de colores. Me hacía llorar. Laqueaba su lienzo con mis
lágrimas blancas nacaradas. Me golpeaba. Lavanda florecía en mi piel. Sus pigmentos de color morado lúgubre igual a mis moretones. Me cortaba. Los ojos de sus personajes eran profundizados por el rojo ardiente de mi sangre. El matiz de fuego se filtraba de los barrancos enormes de mi carne. Él era el maestro de mi negrura, mi vacío, que el usaba para perfilar sus creaciones. Con mis colores, sus obras maestras eran diseñadas. Y yo era su paleta de colores que le ayudaba a crearlas.

– Freya Nott, Year 12

RUNNER UP:

El Silencio Tibio

Una brisa caliente flotó por encima del lago, haciendo ondas en el agua. Acarició los árboles, envió burbujas a la superficie, lo que perturbó el silencio e hizo que las algas pálidas se arremolinasen en las profundidades. Pero la disrupción verdadera empezó con la llegada de la excavadora, acercándose a la orilla, y entonces sumergiéndose. Como un monstruo surgió una enorme masa de lodo, sus ojos saltones. Fue enguirnaldada de plantas, empapada con aceite. La fiera subió en la cuchara, pero de repente, paró, y fue vuelta a las aguas. ‘¿Qué pasa, querida? ¿A ti no te gusta mi sopa?’

– Laria Campbell, Year 12

¡Felicidades a todos los ganadores!

2023 Flash Fiction Results

In December 2022, we launched our annual Flash Fiction competitions, which closed at the end of March. The competitions were open to students in Years 7 to 13, who were tasked with writing a short story of no more than 100 words in French and/or Spanish.

We had an incredible response, with entries coming in from the UK and beyond! In total, we received over 1600 submissions across the two languages!

We would like to thank everyone who entered the competition and commend you all for your hard work and creativity in writing a piece of fiction in a different language. This is a challenging exercise, and a significant achievement – congratulations all!

We are delighted to be able to announce the winners, runners up, and highly commended entries for each language below:

French

In the Years 7-9 category, the winner is Amy Waterworth. The runners-up are Mahmoodur Rahman and Emily Osmundsen.

Photo by Micheile Henderson on Unsplash

The judges also highly commended Amy Docherty, Halaah Anwar, Madeleine Waring, Natasha Davis, Daniel Lambin, Manasvi Dixit, Joaquin Malaga Chavez, Jude Shalaby, Natasha Galvin, and Him Yee Lui.

In the Years 10-11 category, the winner is Emily Yu. The runner ups are Amelia Williams and Sana Deshpande.

The judges also highly commended Jiali Hicks, Anna Li, Jerome Turenne-Rogers, Anisa Begum, Maryam Khan, Sara Bjelanovic, Hugo Cooper-Fogarty, Anonymous, Sophia Thomas, and Arya Dorjee.

In the Years 12-13 category, the winner is Hanan Moyeed. The runner ups are Annabel McGolpin and Darren Lee.

The judges also highly commended Sophie Shen, Niall Slack, Ishana Sonnar, Maliha Uddin, Alexandra Kozlova, Odette Mead, Hugo Scherzer-Facchini, and Daria Knurenko.

The French judging panel were very impressed with all of the submitted stories, and commented the following:

It has been an honour and a delight to judge the entries for the 2023 Flash Fiction competition. With stories of just 100 words, you have shown us the world through the eyes of raindrops, snowflakes, trees, planets, and even a smuggled leg of ham! We read about climate change, flânerie, political and historical events, exile, writer’s block, gender identity, and travelled to other times and worlds. Along the way, we met a life-saving pony, a winter-loving duck, a conscientious cannibal, and many other fascinating characters that ignited our imagination. We would like to thank all participants and congratulate you on producing such wonderfully creative, inspiring, and original texts. Félicitations !

Spanish

In the Years 7-9 category, the winner is Ava Saunders. The runner up is Lily Messer.

The judges also highly commended Carlotta Elliot, Daisy Apfel, Dhritya Sagin, Sona Patel, Saanvi Dwivedi, Pooja Vamadevan, Niamh Daniels, Anonymous, and Klara Andonegui.

In the Years 10-11 category, the winner is Ella Needham. The runner up is Shoshi Ellituv. The judges also highly commended Amelie Huntley, Carlotta Gray, Dingding Zhou, Ella So, Ryan Cheung, Rhea Sandher, Prithika Anbezhil, Mustafa Ayub, Mia White, and Khanh Linh Nguyen.

Photo by Sam Williams on Unsplash

In the Years 12-13 category, the winner is Freya Nott. The runner up is Laria Campbell.

The judges also highly commended Anonymous, Romilly de Silva, Meghan Henderson, Anonymous, Lara Horsely, Charlie Crookes, Edith Scott, Jack Hussey, Josiane Kammani, and Eva Murphy.

Our Spanish judging panel have also been extremely impressed with this year’s entries, and commented the following:

We thoroughly enjoyed reading a diverse selection of short stories for this year’s Spanish Flash Fiction competition, and we want to thank all the participants who took the time to submit their entries. The remarkable level of creativity and storytelling ability demonstrated was truly impressive, making the task of selecting just twelve winning entries exceptionally challenging. The winning entries stood out to us for their fresh and inventive approaches, thought-provoking reflections, engaging writing styles, and their ability to explore different and often unusual perspectives.

Huge congratulations everyone – you should be very proud of your achievement!